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Photo: WildEarth Guardians/Creative Commons (Flickr)

In New Mexico, Facing the Question of What Comes After Coal

, Energy analyst

New Mexico has a chance now, before its coal plants and coal mining operations have closed, and before jobs have been lost, to chart an intentional path toward a clean energy future that is considerate of both the benefits and challenges that such a transition will bring. By committing to an energy plan dominated by renewables, policymakers in the state can secure good jobs, significant capital investment, and a brighter, cleaner, and healthier world for all New Mexicans. Read more >

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Photo: Cristie Guevara/public domain (BY CC0)

USDA Reorganization Sidelines Dietary Guidelines

, Food Systems & Health Analyst

Last month, Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue announced a number of proposed changes to the organization of the vast federal department he oversees. While some of these changes may seem arcane, they will have real impacts on all of us. The proposed merger of two key nutrition programs is a case in point. Read more >

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EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt Accelerates Politicization of Agency’s Science Advisory Board

, Deputy director, Center for Science & Democracy

Earlier today, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt strongly suggested that the agency will not consider any candidate for EPA’s science advisory committees who has received a grant from the agency. Such a gobsmackingly boneheaded move would further hamstring the ability of the EPA to accomplish its public health mission. The administrator is directly challenging the intent of Congress, which established the Science Advisory Board to provide independent scientific advice so that EPA can effectively protect our health and environment. Read more >

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Satellite view of California's wildfires and smoke. NASA's Aqua satellite collected this natural-color image on October 09, 2017. Photo: NASA

How Science Can Help Us Better Prepare for Wildfires: Insights from a NASA Scientist

, senior climate scientist

In the midst of the catastrophic wildfires of Northern California that have claimed 41 lives and either destroyed or damaged more than 5,700 buildings, I wanted to know where the cutting edge of science on this issue is today. What made the California wildfires so strong and unusually destructive? Regardless of what started the fires, what conditions allowed the fires to spread so quickly? Did climate change have anything to do with it? What are scientists currently working on that can help communities better prepare for wildfires?

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