Andrew Rosenberg

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About the author: Andrew Rosenberg is the director of the UCS Center for Science and Democracy. He leads UCS's efforts to advance the essential role that science, evidence-based decision making, and constructive debate play in American policy making. See Andrew's full bio.

EPA’s Proposed Climate Change Rule: Can We Argue About the Right Things This Time?

There is no question that the announcement by Gina McCarthy, the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, of a proposed rule to regulate emissions of greenhouse gases from power plants is one of the most controversial domestic policy actions taken by the Obama Administration. Read More

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House Science Committee Chairman Smith: Please Read the National Climate Assessment

The Third National Climate Assessment is out, fully available to the public, and gives the most detailed picture yet of how global warming is affecting the United States. It was an exhausting effort over more than three years by hundreds of scientists. I had the privilege of being one of the authors, and I am proud of the work we did. Read More

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The U.S. National Climate Assessment: A Detailed Evaluation of the Scientific Evidence on Climate Change

We have heard a lot in the past few weeks about the latest international assessment of climate change impacts as new reports have been finalized by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Of course climate change is a global phenomenon occurring over decades and, for many, it is hard to relate to new information about global changes. But help is on the way! The third U.S. National Climate Assessment is scheduled for release on May 6. Read More

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Science, Democracy and a Healthy Food Environment

There is a clear connection between diet and major diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, some cancers, osteoporosis, and dental cavities. So, I keep asking—why doesn’t the science of public health undergird food policy in the U.S.? Read More

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Any Port in a Storm: Public and Private Sector Funding for Science

A recent article in the New York Times highlighted the profound change that has occurred in the funding of science in the United States. I agree that the science enterprise has changed, and will continue to change, with a much greater opportunity through private philanthropy to support research. Read More

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Sidelined Science: Let’s Get the House Science Committee Back on Track

The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology in the U.S. House of Representatives should lead the way in bringing science into federal legislation and public policy. But, our new analysis of the witnesses the committee is hearing from reveals some troubling trends. Read More

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The Secret Science Reform Act: Perhaps We Should Just Call it Catch-22

Fifty years ago, the great American novelist Joseph Heller was in the midst of writing Catch-22, creating an enduring story and coining a phrase that has become part of our language.  According to Merriam-Webster, Catch-22 means “a problematic situation for which the only solution is denied by a circumstance inherent in the problem or by a rule.”  When I read the book years ago, I remember thinking it was a beautifully elegant example of another common aphorism, “Damned if you do, and damned if you don’t.” Read More

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Federal Trade Commission Pushes Back Against Counterfeit Science

The Center for Science and Democracy at UCS was created because we believe scientific evidence matters—for public policy decisions, and for citizens making decisions every day about their health and well-being. At least as far as truth in advertising goes, it turns out we have a strong ally in the federal government: the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Read More

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Scientific Advice for the New EPA Carbon Emissions Standards: Let’s Clear the Air

This month, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published proposed new standards limiting Greenhouse Gas Emissions from new electricity generating power plants using coal or natural gas. Allegations of secrecy and political interference in science began to surface even before the proposal was released. So do these allegations have any merit? Read More

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Using Science to Address Inaction, Not Just Uncertainty

In a recent article published in Nature, William Sutherland and his colleagues give 20 tips for interpreting scientific claims and suggest educating policy makers on “the imperfect nature of science”. Their tips are useful and perhaps should be cautious reminders on the desk of every scientist before they step forward to provide advice. But the tips can also mislead policymakers into failing to make a decision in the absence of unrealistic, and unattainable, absolute certainty. Read More

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