David Babson

Senior fuels engineer

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David Babson is a senior engineer for the Clean Vehicles Program. He focuses on fuel and fuel policy, including advanced biofuels. Based in Washington, D.C., Dr. Babson has extensive research and policy experience. He served as a AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the Environmental Protection Agency's Transportation and Climate Division, where he reviewed key initiatives like the Renewable Fuel Standard. See David's full bio.

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David's Latest Posts

How to Make Sure the US and Canada Get It Right on Methane

President Barack Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced yesterday that the United States and Canada would partner to cut methane emissions from their oil and gas sectors by 40-45 percent below 2012 levels in under a decade. This is great news, and we applaud this cooperative effort. Read more >

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It’s The Largest Methane Leak in U.S. History. Who’s Responsible?

Perhaps the only thing growing as fast as the Powerball Jackpot this week is the liability that Southern California Gas Company faces for its massive natural gas leak discovered last October. The leak’s three month anniversary, on January 23rd, is expected to pass without any resolution, and current estimates are that it will not be stopped until at least March 2016. We know the leak has very negative implications for the climate—so what is happening to hold the company accountable for its impacts? Read more >

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Earth to API—It’s 2016 (not 1916) and “Energy Voters” Want Renewables

Recent commercials funded by the American Petroleum Institute suggest expanded fossil fuel development will benefit “our children and our grandchildren”—an untruth that won’t work forever. Read more >

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Three Innovative Ways to Power Clean Transportation with Wastes

What some may see as waste may actually be a low-carbon fuel source. Read more >

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Methane is Really Bad. Our Methane Rules Need To Be Really Good.

Methane, the second largest contributor to global warming after carbon dioxide, is a short-lived but extremely powerful greenhouse gas. This is why the Obama administration is moving to curb methane emissions from the largest source of U.S. methane emissions—the oil and gas sector. In August, the EPA proposed methane emission standards for new and modified oil and gas drilling wells. Although this rule is an important and much needed first step, more must be done, including establishing similar standards for existing oil wells, and comprehensively addressing all of the sector’s unnecessary emissions.

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