Jacob Carter

Research scientist, Center for Science and Democracy

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Jacob Carter is a research scientist for the Center for Science and Democracy at the Union of Concerned Scientists. In this role, Dr. Carter investigates how science is used in the policy-making process, focusing on issues of scientific integrity across the federal government. See Jacob's full bio.

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Photo: Patrick Bloodgood/US Army

Superfund Sites and the Floods of Hurricane Harvey: Foreseeable or an “Act of God”?

Superfund sites contain some of the most dangerous chemicals known to humankind. It has been confirmed that Superfund sites in the Houston area were submerged by the floodwaters of Hurricane Harvey. Does this mean these hazardous chemicals were swept away off of Superfund sites into neighboring communities where people live, play, and work? If so, who will be responsible for cleaning up such a disaster? Read more >

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The Trump Administration’s Record on Science Six Months after Inauguration

To address unsolved questions, scientists develop experiments, collect data and then look for patterns. Our predictions of natural phenomena become more powerful over time as evidence builds within the scientific community that the same pattern appears over and over again. So, when the 2016 presidential candidates began speaking out about their positions on science policy, the scientific community was listening, collecting data, and looking for patterns.

In particular, candidate Donald Trump’s positions on space exploration, climate change science, and vaccines sent a chilling and frightening signal to the scientific community of what science policy might look like under a President Trump. We no longer have to wonder if candidate Trump’s positions on science policy would be indicative of President Trump’s positions, as we now have six months of data on the Trump administration’s science policy decisions. Read more >

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How President Trump’s Proposed Budget Cuts Would Harm Early Career Scientists

Kaila Colyott is coming close to graduation as a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Kansas, but she’s not finishing with the same enthusiasm for her career prospects that she began graduate school with.  At the beginning, she wasn’t particularly worried about getting a job after graduation. “I was a first generation student coming from a largely uneducated background. I was pretty stoked about doing science, and I was told that more education would help me land a job in the future.” Read more >

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Pride Month Offers Lessons of Inclusion—Science Should Listen

This year’s pride month is coming to an end, and with it I take many valuable lessons learned. In many ways, pride 2017 was historic. Read more >

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