Jason Funk

Senior climate scientist

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Jason Funk is a senior climate scientist for the Climate and Energy Program and is an expert on land-use emissions. His efforts focus on building a better understanding of the impacts of climate change among communities, stakeholders, and policymakers, and developing effective solutions to reduce these impacts. See Jason's full bio.

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Jason's Latest Posts

Could Climate Change “Steal” New Mexico’s Identity?

There’s an “identity thief” on the loose in New Mexico, and authorities have identified the culprit: climate change. So far, it has attempted to take away the livelihoods, agriculture, homes, ecosystems, and historical touchstones that shape the lives and identities of many New Mexicans—with some success. And it’s just getting started. Fortunately, New Mexico can take some practical and commonsense steps to safeguard its identity against the impacts of a changing climate.

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How to Sound like an Expert on the Paris Climate Agreement

The agreement is multifaceted and written in dense legal language, so it’s difficult to get a sense of what it—and the negotiations—are all about. Here are some answers to a few basic questions to satisfy your curiosity and help you sound like a climate agreement expert. Read more >

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The Paris Climate Conference: Hope in a Time of Hard Realities

The violence in Paris and elsewhere in recent weeks has made parents around the world hug their children a little tighter, and to ask for the strength to confront the many risks we face in the world. Climate change is one of the risks we can change, and the Paris climate talks may mark a moment of global courage, in which we alter our course and begin to build the future we want to leave for our children.

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Climate-Driven Changes on Federal Lands Could Undercut Clean Power Plan Gains

The US Geological Survey has published the first-ever comprehensive estimate of carbon storage on federal lands under future climate scenarios. Initially, it looks like good news: federal lands are projected to store more carbon in 2050 than they did in 2005. However, a closer look reveals that a big chunk of these gains are dependent on the world staying on a relatively low-emissions pathway. The difference in net emissions from federal lands between high- and low-emissions climate scenarios has the potential to undercut the emission reductions expected under the Clean Power Plan. And going deeper, the study may not account for processes that could release much more carbon into the atmosphere.

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Midwestern Rains Putting a Damper on Summer? It Gets Worse with Climate Change

This summer has been a remarkably wet one in the Midwest, punctuated by a few really big downpours. The increase in heavy precipitation has disrupted farming, increased flooding, and threatened cultural landmarks. Recent science tells us that extreme rainfall will become more common in the Midwest if we continue to pump more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Read more >

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