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Jeff Deyette

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About the author: Jeff Deyette is a senior energy analyst with expertise on the economic and environmental implications of renewable energy and energy efficiency policies at the state and federal level. He holds a master’s degree in energy resource and environmental management & international relations. See Jeff's full bio.

Even as Coal Use Declines, Most States Are Still Dependent on Coal Imports

The use of coal to produce electricity in the United States has been declining in recent years. Yet for most states still heavily dependent on coal-fired power, the cost of importing coal continues to be a drain on local economies. According to a new Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) analysis, 37 states were net importers of coal in 2012, paying a total of $19.4 billion to import 433 million tons of coal from other states and even some foreign countries. Instead of sending billions of ratepayer dollars out of those states year after year, consumers would be better served by investing more in local renewable energy development and energy efficiency measures. Read More

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Ripe for Retirement: Examining the Competitiveness of U.S. Coal Plants

This is Part One of a 3-Part Blog Series.

Today, the Union of Concerned Scientists released an update of our 2012 ground-breaking analysis, Ripe for Retirement, examining the economic viability of U.S. coal generators compared with modern, cleaner alternatives. Our new findings, published in Electricity Journal, show that nearly 59 gigawatts (GW) of coal power capacity are not cost competitive when compared with natural gas, and more than 71 GW are uneconomic when compared with wind power. These coal generators are prime candidates for retirement and their closure would provide substantial benefits for consumers and the environment. It would also accelerate the transition to a cleaner, more reliable and affordable energy system. Read More

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TVA Pulls the Plug on More Coal Plants; Others Will Surely Follow

Last week, the Tennessee Valley Authority’s (TVA) board of directors voted in favor of retiring 3,300 megawatts (MW) of coal power capacity. This action is good news for consumers and the environment in the region. It also continues the drumbeat of retirement announcements nationwide and provides further evidence of the eroding economic viability of the aging U.S. coal fleet. A recent UCS analysis, Ripe for Retirement, documents why many more U.S. coal generators should also be considered for closure. Read More

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Fact Checking ALEC’s Attacks on Ohio’s Clean Energy Standards

Members of the Ohio Senate Public Utilities Committee heard testimony this week on two bills that would roll back Ohio’s renewable energy and energy efficiency standards. Backed by fossil-fuel funded special interest groups and their political allies, these proposals would undermine Ohio’s emerging clean energy industries and make the state even more dependent on coal and natural gas. Read More

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Managing Risk in Ohio: Clean Energy’s Role in a Reliable, Diverse Power Supply

“Don’t put all your eggs in one basket” is a mantra often used by investors who diversify their portfolios to protect against volatility in financial markets. It’s also appropriate for the electricity sector in Ohio, a state that has historically been overdependent on coal and is fast becoming over reliant on both coal and natural gas, leaving consumers vulnerable to volatility in energy markets and many other risks. Renewable energy and energy efficiency can help diversify Ohio’s power mix, and bring safe, clean, reliable, and affordable power to consumers, according to a new UCS report. Why then is the central policy that is successfully supporting these clean energy industries in Ohio under attack? Read More

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In Chicago, ALEC Reboots Failed Strategy for Attacking Renewable Energy Policies

Having failed completely in its attempt to repeal state renewable electricity standards (RES) during the spring 2013 legislative season, the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) is shifting gears. Their new strategy is more nuanced, but the goal remains the same: support their fossil fuel cronies by rolling back renewable energy policies. Fortunately, this latest scheme is likely doomed to fail as well. Read More

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Ohio Experts Endorse State’s Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Standards

Scientists, engineers, economists, and public health experts from Ohio’s top academic institutions are working together to make sure policy makers in Columbus get the facts about the Buckeye State’s renewable energy and energy efficiency standards. Read More

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Renewable Electricity Standards Deliver the Goods

Recent efforts to repeal renewable electricity standards (RES) by fossil-fuel backed opponents have been thwarted in Kansas and North Carolina. The reason? As a newly released review of state RES policies by the Union of Concerned Scientists report clearly shows, these popular, bipartisan policies are working effectively all over the country; affordably driving new renewable energy development and delivering substantial economic benefits to states and local communities in the process. Simply put, the facts on the ground are proving difficult to overcome for those seeking to roll back progress toward a clean energy economy. Read More

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Labor and Environment: “Joined at the Hip”

Since its launching in 2006, the Blue-Green Alliance (BGA) has united some of the largest and most impactful unions, environmental, and science-based organizations in an effort to accelerate the transition to a clean and prosperous energy economy. As proud members of the BGA, the Union of Concerned Scientists was well represented at their annual Good Jobs, Green Jobs conference in Washington, DC last week. My colleague and UCS Kendall Fellow Jeremy Richardson was an active participant and logged the following report: Read More

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A Trivial (and Fun) Way to Celebrate Earth Day

Are you looking for an entertaining and engaging way to make a difference this Earth Day? Consider hosting a Cooler Smarter trivia event! It will put you on the path of being a low-carbon leader, and help challenge, inform, and inspire your family and friends to lower their carbon footprint. Read More

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