Jeremy Richardson

Senior energy analyst

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Jeremy Richardson is a senior energy analyst in the Climate and Energy program, conducting analytical work on the Environmental Protection Agency’s carbon regulations. Prior to this position, Dr. Richardson was a Kendall Science Fellow and researched the fundamental cultural and economic drivers of coal production in West Virginia. He has a Ph.D. and M.S. in physics from the University of Colorado at Boulder as well as a B.S. in Physics from West Virginia University. Subscribe to Jeremy's posts

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Jeremy's Latest Posts

Photo credit: Sanjay Suchak.

I’m About to Testify at the EPA. Here’s What I Have to Say….

These days it feels like facts don’t matter—and that’s very disturbing to a scientist like me. So, just for the record, allow me to state some things that are true and obvious, but seem to have been forgotten in the rhetoric around these issues. Read more >

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What’s the Real Story on the Future of Coal?

If you’ve been following news around energy and climate change, or last year’s presidential election, you’ve probably heard a lot about coal and coal miners. Here I’ll try to cut through some of the rhetoric and offer some clear fact-based insights, drawing on a new analysis that the Union of Concerned Scientists just released called, A Dwindling Role for Coal: Tracking the Electricity Sector Transition and What It Means for the Nation. Read more >

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Photo: Sanjay Suchak (used with permission)

This Is What It’s Like to Live Near a Coal Plant in North Carolina

“All we bought from the store was sugar and salt and pepper and we grew everything else, but that all had to stop when the plant was built.” Read more >

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The former Ottawa Street coal-fired power station now serves downtown Lansing, Michigan, as a LEED-certified office building. Photo: JC Kibbey/UCS

How A Coal Plant in Michigan Became an Insurance HQ

The Ottawa Street Power Station provided coal-fired electric power and steam to downtown Lansing from 1939 until it was decommissioned in 1992. What can we learn from its story? Read more >

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A Real Chance to Help Coal Communities—If We Fight for It

UPDATE (27 June 2017): The Natural Resources Committee has approved the Beyer amendment to strengthen the RECLAIM Act and has passed the bill out of committee. Thanks for your support, and stay tuned!

On Tuesday the House Natural Resources Committee plans to vote on the RECLAIM Act, H.R.1731. The bipartisan legislation, sponsored by Congressman Hal Rogers (R-KY-5), would free up $1 billion in existing funding from the Abandoned Mine Lands fund and put people to work cleaning up abandoned coal mines. It’s common-sense legislation that uses existing money (did I mention this is NOT a new tax?!) to create thousands of jobs reclaiming degraded mine lands and putting those lands to use in ways that spur local economic development.

Unfortunately, corporate coal interests have launched a last-minute effort to kill the bill. Read more >

Photo: Wikimedia
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