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Jeremy Richardson

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About the author: Jeremy Richardson is a senior energy analyst in the Climate and Energy program, conducting analytical work on the Environmental Protection Agency’s carbon regulations. Prior to this position, Dr. Richardson was a Kendall Science Fellow and researched the fundamental cultural and economic drivers of coal production in West Virginia. He has a Ph.D. and M.S. in physics from the University of Colorado at Boulder as well as a B.S. in Physics from West Virginia University. Subscribe to Jeremy's posts

Americans—Democrats and Republicans—Support the Clean Power Plan

New polling results released this month found that—despite what you may have heard—the American public broadly supports efforts to reduce global warming emissions from the nation’s power plants. And maybe even more surprising given the political narrative, that support transcends party lines. Read More

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Virginia State of the Commonwealth: Powering Ahead with Renewable Energy

Tonight Governor Terry McAuliffe (D) gave his annual State of the Commonwealth address to the Virginia General Assembly. He outlined his agenda for Virginia and highlighted a number of important issues facing the Commonwealth. What did he say about energy, a topic that has far-reaching implications for Virginia? Read More

Categories: Energy, Global Warming  

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Climate Change Is Impacting West Virginia…but Will Our Students Learn about It?

UPDATE (Jan. 14, 2:40 p.m.): The West Virginia state school board has decided to reinstate the original language of the Next Gen science standards and repost the proposed standards for a 30-day public comment period.

Much has been written about last week’s kerfuffle involving the West Virginia State Board of Education and its decision to alter science standards relating to climate change. Ironically, as the state plans to weaken its science standards to blur what’s known about climate science, a West Virginia group is releasing a report today focusing on the impacts of climate change on the Mountain State. Read More

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An Honest Conversation about Hardworking Coal Miners

I applaud David Roberts over at Grist for elevating a very interesting and timely conversation on worker transition for coal miners. On Monday he argued that the Democratic Party should simply cede Coal Country as collateral damage from the culture war, and instead focus on its base of environmentally minded liberals. And yesterday, in response to many tweets and comments, his blog asked the question, Should the Feds Bail Out Coal Miners? While I agree with many of his arguments, I’d have to disagree with his conclusion (in short, “no”) and offer some ideas about why protecting our coal workers is critical to successfully solving the climate problem. Read More

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Me to the EPA: Increase Renewables, Limit Carbon, and Protect Coal Miners

Today I testified at the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) public hearing in Washington, DC on the proposed carbon standard for existing power plants. My prepared remarks are below. Read More

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Pennsylvania and the Clean Power Plan

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed the first-ever limits on carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants, designed to begin to address the consequences of climate change. The agency has proposed a flexible framework that allows states to decide for themselves how to meet the emissions reductions targets. For many states, the required emissions reductions are actually quite modest, and at UCS we see an opportunity for states to be more ambitious in developing renewable energy in particular. Here I explore what the carbon standard means for Pennsylvania. Read More

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Renewables and Efficiency: Opportunities in the Federal Carbon Standards

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is poised to release the first-ever carbon standards for existing power plants in early June. Since the electricity sector is responsible for about 40 percent of our nation’s carbon dioxide emissions, these standards are a critical component of President Obama’s Climate Action Plan—a series of actions the administration is taking to address the impacts of climate change, which are happening now and getting worse. Renewable energy and energy efficiency are swift and cost-effective ways to achieve the deep cuts in carbon emissions needed to tackle the climate crisis, and can provide a multitude of benefits to states and communities. Read More

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Heads in the Sand: Koch Brothers Push States to Avoid Carbon Rules

The Environmental Protection Agency is poised to limit carbon pollution from existing power plants, following President Obama’s Climate Action Plan announced last summer. The states will have a leadership role in designing plans to achieve the reductions in the most cost-effective way. Read More

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The Economic Impacts of Future Coal Production in West Virginia

Last month colleagues and I published a paper in the journal Environmental Research Letters, focusing on the economic impacts of future coal production on West Virginia. Using scenarios for projected coal production published by the Energy Information Administration in its Annual Energy Outlook, we set out to understand how these projections might impact the economy of West Virginia, the second largest coal-producing state in the United States. Read More

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West Virginia’s Future Fund One Step Closer to Reality

The West Virginia Senate today unanimously passed a bill to establish the West Virginia Future Fund. SB 461 now moves to the House of Delegates for consideration. This fund represents an important step toward a brighter economic future for West Virginia. The House should also vote yes. Read More

Categories: Energy  

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