Mike Jacobs

Senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

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Michael Jacobs is a senior energy analyst with expertise in electricity markets, transmission and renewables integration work. See Mike's full bio.

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Photo: Chris Hunkeler/CC BY-SA (Flickr)

How Do We Get to 100% Renewable Energy? Could be Storage, Storage, Storage

As communities, companies, and even entire Midwestern utility companies move to supply 100% of electricity needs from renewable energy, the question presents itself: is this even possible? The answer, it turns out, is yes—and it’s made possible by the technical capabilities of advanced energy technologies (and especially storage).
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Photo: Chris Hunkeler/CC BY-SA (Flickr)
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Here’s an Energy Savings Plan: Buy When Prices Are Lower

Shopping for a discount makes sense, right? Let’s see what we can save if we try this with electricity. Read more >

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Installing solar panels in PA
Photo: Public Source

Solar vs Nuclear: The Tale of Two Energy Sources

Last year’s solar deployment numbers just came in, and they are, in a word, phenomenal. Utilities bought more new solar capacity than they did natural gas capacity: an astounding 22 states added more than 100 MW of solar each.

At the same time, there is grim news about delays in construction and associated cost over-runs  for nuclear plant construction projects in Georgia and South Carolina. Read more >

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Courtesy: hint.fm/wind

Rick Perry and the “Texas Approach” to Renewable Energy and Infrastructure

Rick Perry—Trump’s pick for the Department of Energy—saw how infrastructure can impact energy development when he was governor of Texas.
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Polar Vortex Returns. Will Wind Energy Be Left Out in the Cold?

The Polar Vortex in 2014 revealed issues with over-reliance on natural gas  and under-appreciation of wind and customer demand response. The Union of Concerned Scientists is pushing to correct mistakes when made when the low price of natural gas for most of the year fooled a lot of people who should know better. Assumptions that natural gas would be just as available in a cold snap as in mild weather created havoc with electric power plants that rely, perhaps over-rely, on natural gas when the cold snap came. Read more >

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