Join
Search

Rachel Cleetus

http://blog.ucsusa.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/rachel-cleetus-95px.jpg

About the author: Rachel Cleetus is an expert on the design and economic evaluation of climate and energy policies, as well as the costs of climate change. She holds a Ph.D. in economics. See Rachel's full bio.

Obama Directs the EPA to “Work Expeditiously” to Complete Standards for New and Existing Power Plants: Now the Details on How the EPA Can Deliver the Goods

Today President Obama will make a major speech outlining his administration’s plans to cut carbon emissions through agency actions. The centerpiece of the speech is expected to be an announcement that the President will direct the EPA to move ahead in setting carbon standards for both new and existing power plants. Today and in the weeks to come we’ll be following closely to hear the details on both timing and substance for these standards. Read More

Bookmark and Share

We Need a Clear Signal that the Obama Administration Will Issue Power Plant Carbon Standards Soon

More than a year after the EPA issued its draft carbon standards for new power plants, and subsequently received over 3.2 million comments in support of them, it has yet to finalize the standards. Meanwhile last week the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released a report saying the U.S. experienced $110 billion in damages from extreme weather in 2012, with Sandy ($65 billion) and the drought ($30 billion) being the two most costly events. We need President Obama to show that his administration is committed to continued, ambitious action to cut carbon emissions, delivering on his Inaugural Address promise. Read More

Bookmark and Share

New IEA Report Shows (Yet Again!) that We Have the Tools to Cut Global Warming Emissions; Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency are Critical

Today the International Energy Agency (IEA) released a new climate and energy report that highlights the inexorable growth in our heat-trapping emissions and reiterates the urgent need for a rapid ramp-up of renewable energy and energy efficiency resources to help address climate change. Cutting fugitive methane emissions and reducing fossil fuel subsidies are other important recommendations. Read More

Bookmark and Share

Coastal Communities on the Front Lines of Sea Level Rise and Flooding: Convening a Conversation

Last week, almost six months after Hurricane Sandy came ashore to devastating effect, UCS convened a multi-state roundtable on the growing risks from sea level rise, storm surges, and flooding. Officials from Florida, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, and Virginia, together with a representative from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, came together to talk about what they are doing to help protect their communities from these risks and what future steps may be needed to build resilience. Read More

Bookmark and Share

Costly Climate Impacts Show Why We Need Power Plant Carbon Standards

Tomorrow the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will likely miss a legal deadline for finalizing its draft carbon standard for curtailing carbon emissions from new power plants. Power plants are the single largest stationary source of  U.S. global warming emissions. Cutting those emissions is critical to slowing the magnitude and pace of climate change. Furthermore, an ambitious standard is achievable because we have abundant cleaner forms of energy. So why the delay? Read More

Bookmark and Share

White House Champions of Change Event Features Community Resilience Leaders

Today’s “Champions of Change” event in Washington can be seen as a kick-off for a desperately-needed national conversation on climate change. It couldn’t have had a more fitting theme: “Preparing for the Costly Impacts of Climate Change – Community Resilience Leaders.” Read More

Bookmark and Share

Well-Designed Power Plant Carbon Standards Can Reduce Emissions and Increase Renewable Energy

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is expected to soon finalize carbon standards for new power plants, bolstering the existing market trend away from building new coal-fired power plants. Next up is the carbon standard for existing power plants – a major source of U.S. global warming emissions. Designing this standard with the flexibility to include renewable energy and efficiency as compliance options can help achieve deep emissions reductions at an affordable cost. Read More

Bookmark and Share

Rebuilding for Climate Resilience in the Wake of Hurricane Sandy

It’s been three months since Hurricane Sandy pounded the coasts of New Jersey and New York (among other places), changing forever our understanding of our vulnerability to coastal flooding. While recovery and rebuilding continues to be a long, hard, painful process, there are encouraging signs that we may have begun an important national conversation about facing climate risks in a more resilient way. Read More

Bookmark and Share

2013 Begins Without Respite from Drought

The latest map from the U.S. Drought Monitor and predictions from National Weather Service were released today. They show a grim picture of continuing drought for the foreseeable future for large swathes of the U.S. Read More

Bookmark and Share

A Crucial Benchmark for Climate Action is at Risk. Why it Matters Now More than Ever.

Several recent reports have pointed out that without significant, immediate action to lower global warming emissions, we are getting dangerously close to blowing past emissions levels that would lead to a 2°C or more increase in global temperatures. That may lead some to think that the 2°C benchmark is becoming increasingly irrelevant, but nothing could be further from the truth. Read More

Categories: Global Warming  

Tags: ,   

Bookmark and Share