Roberto Mera

Scientist and Kendall Science Fellow

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Roberto Mera is a climate scientist and Kendall Science Fellow in climate attribution. His work entails analyzing specific carbon emissions to determine how they are affecting global temperatures and extreme heat events. He holds a Ph.D. in marine, earth and atmospheric science from North Carolina State. See Roberto’s full bio.

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Roberto's Latest Posts

On Katrina, My Family, And Knowing The Big One Was Coming

Hurricane Katrina devastated my home city of New Orleans in 2005, taking lives and erasing dreams. And it changed the fabric of the city.

The losses experienced from Katrina were partly due to the strength of the storm and also partly due to engineers’ underestimation of what a storm of this magnitude could do. Inadequate planning also played a role in the impacts faced by New Orleans.

The truth, however, is that Katrina could have been worse. Read more >

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Crazy Hot Days, Crazy Warm Nights: A New Study on Climate Change in California’s Central Valley

Last week I, along with an international group of scientists, published a study in the journal Climatic Change in which we found that the hottest summer days (24 hour periods) in the Central Valley were twice as likely to occur due to climate change. Heat waves in California’s Central Valley have become progressively more severe in recent decades due to  higher humidity and warmer nighttime temperatures. Observations obtained from NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center show that Central Valley nighttime temperatures were nearly 2°F (1°C) warmer in the 2000s compared to the 1901-1960 average and even higher for the whole of California (see plot below). Read more >

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Was There No Global Warming Slowdown? A New Paper Challenges the Theory

NOAA scientists released a study last week in Science magazine detailing how new updates on observations show there has been no global warming slowdown.

In science we are always looking for more data to validate results. It is a bit like being a detective: the more information you have, the better the case. For global warming it is meteorological stations overland and buoys and ship data over the ocean. Read more >

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You Can Help Investigate the Link between Climate Change and Extreme Weather Events

The power of citizen science has pushed the boundary on what climate science can tell us about our changing climate, including extreme events. If you have a computer, you can help us advance the science and make connections between climate change and extreme events. Please join me and thousands of others on this journey — become a citizen scientist today! Read more >

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Why COP 20 Lima Matters to South American Countries

The Conference of Parties (COP20) currently being held in Lima is critically important for South American countries given their exposure to climate change impacts. Land surface changes, fossil fuel extraction, and sea level rise are key concerns for these countries. Read more >

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