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Roberto Mera

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About the author: Roberto Mera is a climate scientist and Kendall Science Fellow in climate attribution. His work entails analyzing specific carbon emissions to determine how they are affecting global temperatures and extreme heat events. He holds a Ph.D. in marine, earth and atmospheric science from North Carolina State. See Roberto’s full bio.

Heat and Humidity, Climate Change, and the Future of the World Cup

A curious thing happened in the USA-Portugal match last Tuesday, played deep in the Amazon jungle in the city of Manaus. The players took a 1-minute break to drink some fluids. This was a new rule instituted by FIFA, the world’s soccer governing body, to allow players to recover during a match. Read More

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Could the Climate from Game of Thrones Happen on Earth?

The widely popular HBO show, Game of Thrones, features an unusual climate: summers that can last for seven years and winters that span a generation. Could this type of climate happen on Earth? Read More

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Are the California Wildfires a Sign of Climate Change?

The exceptional heat in Southern California and the dangerous wildfires occurring since May 13 may be a sign of climate change given their severity and timing. As of Friday, May 16, over 10,000 acres have burned throughout Southern California and several locations have surpassed previous temperature records. Read More

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The Silent Killer: Extreme Heat in the Western U.S.

The National Climate Assessment (NCA) makes an important statement: the trends in heat waves for the western U.S. are alarmingly clear and pose a major threat for the local population. Heat waves are becoming more common and more severe in this region and their increase in frequency and severity is consistent with a warming world. Read More

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Africa’s Meningitis Belt and the Power of a Single Weather Forecast

During spring 2009 I started experimenting with 7- to 14-day forecasts for West Africa as part of a project to help with meningitis mitigation in the region. A single forecast for West Africa shed light on a type of system capable of changing conditions in the region, one that can contribute to the cessation of meningitis epidemics. The findings were recently published after many years of work. Read More

Categories: Global Warming  

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The Ocean’s Cooling Effect: An Air Conditioner for the Planet

The tropical Pacific Ocean has been acting as a type of air conditioner for the planet during the past decade and a half by slowing the rate of global warming. Recent research suggests that the “speed bump” is in large part due to cooler-than-average sea surface temperatures. Read More

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