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Roberto Mera

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About the author: Roberto Mera is a climate scientist and Kendall Science Fellow in climate attribution. His work entails analyzing specific carbon emissions to determine how they are affecting global temperatures and extreme heat events. He holds a Ph.D. in marine, earth and atmospheric science from North Carolina State. See Roberto’s full bio.

Why COP 20 Lima Matters to South American Countries

The Conference of Parties (COP20) currently being held in Lima is critically important for South American countries given their exposure to climate change impacts. Land surface changes, fossil fuel extraction, and sea level rise are key concerns for these countries. Read More

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Interstellar: Climate Change and the Evolution of Cli-Fi Movies

Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar is as much about outer space as it is about our own planet. The story arc begins with a dying earth that can no longer support humanity and ends with a lesson on what it takes to survive. Read More

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It’s Cold Out But it’s Not the Polar Vortex

The “polar vortex” is synonymous with cold air blasts for Americans. But is it correct to equate polar air with the polar vortex? The answer is no. Read More

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The Bering Sea Bomb and the Polar Vortex in our Warming World

A historic storm occurred over Alaska this past weekend as typhoon Nuri merged with an extra tropical system and became a perfect storm. With it also came the chance for more extreme weather for the United States in the form of a small polar vortex event that flooded much of eastern North America with frigid temperatures. But how can we have such cold outbreaks in our warming world? Read More

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Warming Trends in the Pacific Northwest Are Not Due to Natural Variability

During the past several weeks, my phone weather alert has repeatedly shown Corvallis and Portland, Oregon, having fire and low humidity alerts. I did my postdoc there and remember the smell of burning woods during August and September. There have been record-setting wildfires this year in the Pacific Northwest and climate scientists argue that climate change is likely to make it worse due to increasing temperatures. Read More

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Why Are Latinos Way Ahead of the Climate Change Curve?

In the summer of 2009 I had a unique opportunity in my young professional career. I gave several lectures on climate change and society at various venues in Guayaquil, Ecuador. There was a common theme throughout my talks: the audience accepted climate science and strongly felt that they had to act. This sentiment was shared by people with varied backgrounds, from architects to soybean farmers to students. Read More

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Hawaii Hurricanes, El Niño, and Climate Change

A rare event occurred this past weekend when two tropical systems approached the state of Hawaii. Hurricanes happen only occasionally in this part of the world because a fairly constant high pressure system deflects most of the storms. Also, the waters around Hawaii are typically cooler than tropical systems need in order to maintain their strength. Read More

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Heat and Humidity, Climate Change, and the Future of the World Cup

A curious thing happened in the USA-Portugal match last Tuesday, played deep in the Amazon jungle in the city of Manaus. The players took a 1-minute break to drink some fluids. This was a new rule instituted by FIFA, the world’s soccer governing body, to allow players to recover during a match. Read More

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Could the Climate from Game of Thrones Happen on Earth?

The widely popular HBO show, Game of Thrones, features an unusual climate: summers that can last for seven years and winters that span a generation. Could this type of climate happen on Earth? Read More

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Are the California Wildfires a Sign of Climate Change?

The exceptional heat in Southern California and the dangerous wildfires occurring since May 13 may be a sign of climate change given their severity and timing. As of Friday, May 16, over 10,000 acres have burned throughout Southern California and several locations have surpassed previous temperature records. Read More

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