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UCS Science Network

About the author: Through our Science Network, UCS collaborates with nearly 20,000 scientists and technical experts across the country, including physicists, ecologists, engineers, public health professionals, economists, and energy analysts. Science Network Voices gives Equation readers access to the depth of expertise and broad perspective on current issues that our Science Network members bring to UCS. The views expressed in Science Network posts are those of the author alone.

College/Underserved Community Partnership Program: Building a Better Tomorrow through the Power of Partnerships

Guest Bogger

Michael W. Burns, Senior Advisor for the Regional Administrator
Environmental Protection Agency, Region 4

Atlanta, GA

What if there was a federal program that connected universities and underserved communities to work together to address critical issues? Would you be surprised if I told you that program already existed? What if I told you that program was created in part to improve the efficiency of government spending—would that shock you? Read More

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Climate Change Is Boring

Guest Bogger

Dr. Rod Lamberts, Deputy Director
Australian National Centre for Public Awareness of Science

Canberra, Australia

When it comes to climate change, I’m pretty sure there are really only three types of people. Those who believe we’re buggering things up, those who don’t believe we’re buggering things up, and those who don’t know (and maybe don’t give a toss) either way.

Sure there are sub-groups, cliques and factions, but these are the big three. And nowadays it’s clear to me they all have one fundamental thing in common. For all these groups, hearing more science information about climate change makes no practical difference. The acceptors keep accepting, the deniers keep denying, and the ‘meh’ crowd keep on meh-ing.

So why are we still spraying the media waves with public communications full of climate science? Read More

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Why Community-Based Research Matters to Science and People

Guest Bogger

Lauren Richter, Doctoral Student
Department of Sociology, Northeastern University

Boston, Massachusetts

When and how does research serve people? When and how does community-based participatory research improve the “rigor, relevance and reach” of science itself? Today we are witnessing an increase in collaborative research projects that seek to address environmental and environmental health issues in polluted communities. While an academic scientist may have access to labs and facilities, a community living near an industrial-scale hog farm in North Carolina may have unique insights about the types of exposures and acute and chronic health impacts they routinely feel and observe. Read More

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Not Just Another Powerpoint: More Tips to Bring Presentations to Life

Guest Bogger

Andrew Gunther, Executive Director, Center for Ecosystem Management & Restoration
Marcia DeLonge, Agroecologist, Union of Concerned Scientists

Scientists are trained to leave ourselves out of our work—to leave passion at the door, and let objectivity guide us. This makes for great science, but can make for boring presentations. On a recent Science Network webinar, we shared guidelines and examples of how to give engaging, compelling, yet scientifically accurate presentations. Read More

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Did Wyoming Really Just Outlaw Citizen Science?

Guest Bogger

Amy Freitag
Research Associate, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

I first heard about the new Wyoming law #SF0012 through the Slate article summarizing it as a criminalization of citizen science. There’s a real danger that it could be interpreted and implemented that way, but let’s try and give Wyoming the benefit of the doubt for a minute. Read More

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Building Community Power: Science and Storytelling

Guest Bogger

Miranda Chien-Hale
Master of Environmental Management Candidate, Duke University

Durham, North Carolina

My class on California’s water crisis finished a few minutes early last week. I immediately rushed over to Duke University’s Bryan Center, hoping to still grab a bit of food before Paul Greenberg, author of Four Fish, began his talk. I managed to scoop up two appetizers before I headed into the theatre. Read More

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Lead Poisoning: A Modern Plague among Children

Guest Bogger

Dr. Wornie Reed
Director of the Race and Social Policy Research Center

Blacksburg, VA

I am an advocate for bringing more public attention to the critical issue of childhood lead poisoning. It is the number one environmental health threat to children. Lead present in paint, dust, and soil is possibly our most significant toxic waste problem in terms of the seriousness and the extent of human health effects. Lead poisoning is more dangerous than some forms of cancer—yet it is virtually ignored by the American public. Read More

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The Problem with the Environmental Movement

Guest Bogger

Alexis Goggans
M.S., Interdisciplinary Sustainability Studies

Washington, DC

Believe it or not, I wasn’t always an environmentalist. In fact, I didn’t know about composting or environmental justice until I was 19 years old. I often tell people with a precarious smile that it was my undergraduate studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder that turned me into the person I am today. But my journey to full-blown New Age hippy didn’t start with “save the whale” protests or “save the rainforest” campaigns. It began with environmental justice.  Read More

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Detective or Scientist? Fingerprinting the Ocean to Estimate Global Sea Level Rise

Guest Bogger

Carling Hay, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral fellow, Harvard University & Rutgers University

Cambridge, MA

When you pick up the newspaper or turn on the television, you are likely to find a story about climate change and rising sea levels. Most of these stories focus on making predictions for the next century and beyond. After all, don’t we already have a complete understanding of the past? The answer to that question isn’t quite so simple.   Read More

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Next Generation Conservation: Planning for Palm Oil and Orang-utans

Guest Bogger

Marc Ancrenaz
Co-founder, Borneo Futures Initiative

Sabah, Borneo

The word “Borneo” has always evoked Jungle Book-like images for me: an idyllic place free of human intervention, covered with endless tropical virgin jungles and majestic trees, inhabited by amazing creatures, especially the “people of the forest” or orang-utan. Read More

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