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UCS Science Network

About the author: Through our Science Network, UCS collaborates with nearly 20,000 scientists and technical experts across the country, including physicists, ecologists, engineers, public health professionals, economists, and energy analysts. Science Network Voices gives Equation readers access to the depth of expertise and broad perspective on current issues that our Science Network members bring to UCS. The views expressed in Science Network posts are those of the author alone.

Will Climate Change Embolden the Environmental Justice Movement?

Guest Bogger

Ramin Skibba, Assistant Project Scientist
Center for Astrophysics & Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego

San Diego, California

We are at an historic anniversary: the Civil Rights Act was enacted fifty years ago on July 2nd 1964. According to the legislation, all persons “shall be entitled to the full and equal enjoyment of…any place of public accommodation, as defined in this section, without discrimination” based on race, color, religion, or national origin. Read More

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It’s Electric! The Science of Cleaner Vehicles

Guest Bogger

James Nolan, Associate Professor
Department of Biology, Georgia Gwinnett College

Lawrenceville, GA

I’m a biochemist by training, but my family’s leap into Electric Vehicle (EV) driving was not entirely a reasoned scientific choice, initially. We have always been energy-conscious, even before climate change was on our radar. We have always tried to live near our workplaces to save fuel and time. When hybrid vehicles came on the market, we did not seriously consider buying one, because it did not make economic sense for us; our savings on fuel would never match the difference in up-front price of a hybrid at that time.  The BP oil spill on April 20, 2010 changed the equation for us. Read More

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Climate, Communities of Color, and Connections: Interview with Audrey Peterman

Guest Bogger

Audrey Peterman, President and Co-founder of Earthwise Productions, Inc.

Fort Lauderdale, Florida

“Because I know these stories I am wholly unable to sit quietly by or to lend my energies to the induced apathy from which our country suffers. The elevation of Fort Monroe to the status of National Monument gives us a window into our natural and cultural heritage and shows us our connectedness as a nation…I fervently hope that the Fort Monroe story inspires us to wake up and address the most pressing threat faced by our generation – climate change.” Audrey Peterman Read More

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Creating Order in Chaos, Or Why I Study EV Battery Recycling

Guest Bogger

Linda Gaines, Transportation Systems Analyst
Center for Transportation Research, Argonne National Laboratory

Argonne, IL

I spend much of my time trying to create order out of disorganized information. That’s what scientists do. I decided to become a scientist when I understood the beautiful way the Periodic Table organizes the chemical elements. Read More

Categories: Vehicles  

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Blind Faith vs. Insight: Employing Media Literacy to Reject Policies that Harm Human Health

Guest Bogger

Melinda Hemmelgarn, Registered Dietitian
Food Sleuth Radio, KOPN

Columbia, MO

As a dietitian who attempts to connect the dots between food, health and agriculture, my first job is to help my audiences think ecologically—to understand ripple effects—or how one influences others. Read More

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Michigan Needs a Stronger Renewable Energy Standard

Guest Bogger

Dr. John Patten
Professor and Chair, Department of Manufacturing Engineering, and Director, Manufacturing Research Center, Western Michigan University

Kalamazoo, MI

The idea of switching over to renewable energy really came together for me during the oil embargoes of the 1970s, while I was in college and working at General Motors. I could not get gas for my car and we could not get enough oil for lubricants, cutting fluids and hydraulics at work. These events put me on a 40-year career path working in clean energy, starting with studying solar energy at the University of Florida and Oakland University, to working as an energy engineer, and I’ve been practicing and implementing what I learned ever since. Read More

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Why Should We Conserve Southeast Asia’s Peat Swamp Forests?

Guest Bogger

David S. Wilcove, Professor & Xingli Giam, Ph.D. candidate
Princeton University

Princeton, New Jersey

A fetid swamp filled with dangerous animals and diseases.  A vast expanse of muck serving no useful purpose.  A century ago, that was the way people viewed the Everglades in the United States, and they went about ditching and draining this amazing wetland until much of it had been converted to “useful” cropland and pastures, and the wildlife had been decimated.  Read More

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Blurring the Lines: Integrating Science and Policy

Guest Bogger

Julian Reyes, IGERT NSPIRE Fellow
Civil and Environmental Engineering, Washington State University

Pullman, Washington

When I was eleven, I would diligently watch The Weather Channel’s “Tropical Update” and carefully track movements of tropical storms. This segment had a cult following—me. Visiting my relatives one summer, they found it odd that I preferred The Weather Channel over cartoons on a Saturday morning. Read More

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Best of Both Worlds: Preserving Agriculture on the Urban Fringe

Guest Bogger

Eric Christianson, MS Iowa State University
Graduate Program in Sustainable Agriculture and MCRP Community and Regional Planning

Ames, Iowa

Growing up the son of a corn and bean farmer in northern Illinois, I remember my parents talking jealously about a neighbor who received a generous offer from a developer for his farmland. It seemed a great fortune to me for farmers to be able to profit so handsomely from the expansion of cities. Read More

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How Sequestration Made Me a Citizen Scientist

Guest Bogger

Samuel Brinton, graduate student
Nuclear Engineering and the Technology and Policy Program, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Cambridge, Massachusetts

In the fall of 2011, I had just started my graduate studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology studying in the Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering and Technology and Policy Program. I undertook joint study in Nuclear Engineering and Technology Policy because as the son of a Three Mile Island community survivor, I understand that policy implications of misunderstood technologies can have drastic effects. Read More

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