UCS Science Network

UCS

Through our Science Network, UCS collaborates with nearly 20,000 scientists and technical experts across the country, including physicists, ecologists, engineers, public health professionals, economists, and energy analysts. Science Network Voices gives Equation readers access to the depth of expertise and broad perspective on current issues that our Science Network members bring to UCS. The views expressed in Science Network posts are those of the author alone.

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Photo: Paulo Brando

Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon in 2016: the Lazy Dragon Woke Up

Paulo Moutinho, Ph.D., and Raissa Guerra, Ph.D.

In Brazil, deforestation in the Amazon has been compared to a starved dragon. However, this dragon has been under control in the past. Deforestation in the region declined 70% from 2005 (19,014 km2) to 2014 (5,012 km2) in response to different strategies described in the literature. But the monster was not killed, it was just taking a nap. Read more >

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Graduate Students Organize to Promote Science-Informed Leadership in the New Executive Administration

Katy Dynarski

What do the Curiosity Mars rover, the personal computer, and the antibiotic streptomycin have in common? They’re all inventions and discoveries made in America. Read more >

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Eyes on the Solar Photovoltaic Revolution: 35 Years in a Front-Row Seat

Howard Branz

When I got into solar energy research in 1981, I wanted to change the world. I worried to my father that I’d never see widespread use of solar energy in my lifetime. That made him worry, too—about my future job prospects. As it turned out, there were plenty of jobs and I got to play my part in the history of human technology. I was one of a dedicated legion of scientists, engineers, technicians, laboratories and companies who eventually made photovoltaic cells into a commodity product: durable panels that achieve a miraculous-seeming conversion of sunlight to electricity, without needing any moving parts.

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Photo: Roy Luck/CC BY 2.0 (Flickr)

Breaking Up (with Stuff) is Hard to Do: Are We Biologically Predisposed to Collect Stuff?

Mary Poffenroth

Have you ever wondered why we enjoy stuff so much? We definitely enjoy buying it. Depending on what it is, we also enjoy talking about it. We research it, we browse for it, and we feel triumphant when we find that perfect something. But why? Read more >

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500 Women Scientists Pledge for Democracy: Finding Hope in the Growing Numbers

Theresa Jedd

Our story is one of hope, both for democracy and for science. It is a story of the catalyzing power of a few to bring together the many. It is a story of how, in a matter of days, we were able to find strength in numbers.

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