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What Would We Do With Cheap Energy Storage Batteries?

What would we do if cheap energy storage became a reality? We would put an end to carbon emissions from fossil fuel. The debate would be over. The missing pieces of the puzzle would be in hand.

This is something to contemplate. Read More

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Tesla Surges Ahead on Energy Storage

It’s been an exciting week for clean energy in California, with strong action by the governor on carbon pollution and a bold announcement expected on energy storage that will accelerate our clean energy transition. Read More

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How to Cut Carbon and Save Money: RGGI Delivers Yet Again

Yesterday the nine states that participate in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) released a report that highlights the continuing success of the nation’s longest-running carbon market. The big takeaway: yes, it is possible to tackle our climate and energy challenges while delivering huge benefits to consumers! Read More

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Renewables and Efficiency: Achieving Illinois’s Clean Energy Potential

We’ve just put out a new study that shows how strengthening Illinois’s energy efficiency portfolio standard (EEPS) and renewable portfolio standard (RPS) would reestablish Illinois as a national clean energy leader, and would drive billions of dollars in new investment to develop Illinois’s clean energy resources. What’s more, strengthening both the EEPS and RPS is achievable, affordable, and would save consumers billions in avoided energy costs even after accounting for the clean energy investments. Read More

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Another Misleading Study on the Clean Power Plan: NERC Distorts Reality with False Premise and Assumptions

We are on the verge of another transition in how we supply energy to the modern economy. Economics and advances in renewable energy show we can adapt to a series of emissions control requirements affecting coal plants. But a new study of the EPA’s carbon policy excludes these lessons, and assumes the worst behavior of plant owners and state officials to paint an overly pessimistic view of how this transition will impact the reliability of our energy supply. Read More

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Annual Energy Outlook 2015: EIA Consistently Lowballs Renewables, Undercuts Climate Change Efforts

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration is about to publish its annual best guess as to what the future will hold, energy-wise. But if the past is any guide, their best guess is likely to lowball renewable energy’s potential contribution. That has real implications for our nation’s efforts to tackle climate change. Here’s what to watch for when the 2015 Annual Energy Outlook comes out, and why it matters. Read More

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Proof that California’s Water Sector Can Be a Climate Leader: Sonoma County Celebrates “Carbon-Free” Water

Today, I am at the Sonoma County Water Agency celebrating the achievement of their goal to provide “carbon-free water.” That means that no fossil fuels are burned in order to provide water services (including capturing, cleaning, and delivering drinking water to taps along with treating wastewater). This achievement is a powerful proof of concept, showing how the water sector can be a part of the state’s ambitious climate efforts. Read More

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U.S. Can Lead on Global Climate Action: Clean Power Plan Is a Linchpin

Today we are expecting the U.S. to make public its proposed contribution to the global effort to tackle climate change as part of the UNFCCC process. This announcement will come in the form of the so-called U.S. ‘Intended Nationally Determined Contribution’ or INDC. The Clean Power Plan to limit carbon emissions from power plants is a critical element of the emissions reductions that the U.S. can make by 2025. Read More

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Three Reasons Carbon Reduction Is Easy In The Central U.S.

The debate over reliability and the costs of reducing carbon pollution comes to St. Louis with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) holding a technical conference on the electricity grid with the EPA carbon pollution rules. Folks looking at this debate should consider three reasons why the central U.S. has great opportunities to reduce carbon pollution: Read More

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Natural Gas: A Runaway Train or a Helping Hand?

The United States stands at an energy crossroads. Coal-fired power plants generated about half of our electricity as recently as 2007, but are now being retired at a record rate due to age, cost, and the need to cut carbon pollution. Aging nuclear power plants, which generate about twenty percent of our electricity, are also heading towards retirement, and few new plants are being built.

What will replace them? There are two paths forward. Read More

Categories: Energy, Fossil Fuels, Global Warming  

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