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What do Star Wars, Indiana Jones, and Indonesian Forests All Have in Common?

The answer, of course, is Harrison Ford. He stars in Showtime’s new dramatic documentary series on climate change Years of Living Dangerously, and deforestation due to palm oil is Ford’s latest crusade. Read More

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Why Should We Conserve Southeast Asia’s Peat Swamp Forests?

Guest Bogger

David S. Wilcove, Professor & Xingli Giam, Ph.D. candidate
Princeton University

Princeton, New Jersey

A fetid swamp filled with dangerous animals and diseases.  A vast expanse of muck serving no useful purpose.  A century ago, that was the way people viewed the Everglades in the United States, and they went about ditching and draining this amazing wetland until much of it had been converted to “useful” cropland and pastures, and the wildlife had been decimated.  Read More

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Arctic Sea Ice Thins as Old Thick Ice Rapidly Disappears

Last week brought news of yet another alarming season for sea ice in the Arctic. The National Snow and Ice Data Center announced the Arctic sea ice coverage for winter was the fifth lowest maximum on record. The extent of ice was more than 280,000 square miles below the 30-year average for 1981-2010. That’s an area just bigger than the size of Texas missing. Read More

Categories: Global Warming  

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Africa’s Meningitis Belt and the Power of a Single Weather Forecast

During spring 2009 I started experimenting with 7- to 14-day forecasts for West Africa as part of a project to help with meningitis mitigation in the region. A single forecast for West Africa shed light on a type of system capable of changing conditions in the region, one that can contribute to the cessation of meningitis epidemics. The findings were recently published after many years of work. Read More

Categories: Global Warming  

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How Many Products with Palm Oil Do I Use in a Day?

I’ve heard it. You’ve heard it. We’ve all heard it. In fact, I’ve even written it, “While most U.S. consumers have never gone to the supermarket and purchased a bottle of palm oil directly, as they would, say, canola or olive oil, chances are good that they use a product containing palm oil every day.” Read More

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Top 5 Ways the Latest IPCC Review of Climate Change Reflects the U.S. Experience

Reading the summary of the IPCC report on climate impacts, I was struck by the parallels between the major findings and the observed trends in the U.S. Read More

Categories: Global Warming  

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Which Costs More? Transmission Lines for 10x More Renewable Energy, or Pipelines for 2x More Natural Gas

Two recent reports make clear that long-distance gas pipeline infrastructure will cost more than the transmission investment needed for achieving 80% renewable electricity. The Keystone XL pipeline is just one new pipeline – let’s think about the energy system we are building. Read More

Categories: Energy, Fossil Fuels, Global Warming  

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President Obama’s Plan to Cut Methane Emissions Will Help Reduce Climate Risks of Natural Gas

On Friday, the Obama Administration released a multi-sector strategy to cut methane emissions from agriculture, landfills, coal mines, and oil and gas production. This is an important step to reduce the climate risks of natural gas — as long as we get the details right — and to create a more level playing field for cleaner, less risky options like renewable energy and energy efficiency. Read More

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Climate Change May Cause Baseball Ticket Prices to Rise

First, Chipotle warned of peak guacamole. Now, Major League Baseball is claiming that it may need to raise ticket prices across the board for the 2015 season because the cost of baseballs is expected to rise due to climate change. The warning came in a quarterly filing submitted to the Securities and Exchange Commission by MLB Commissioner Bud Selig. Read More

Categories: Global Warming  

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On Human Strength and Climate Change: Thoughts on Chavez Day

It’s now officially Chavez Day in the State of California, in honor of his birthday on March 31st. Someone suggested that I write a blog connecting Chavez Day with how climate change will affect farms and farmworkers, and that’s what I set out to do. Science tells us that climate change will indeed wreak increasing havoc on the agricultural industry — heat waves that can and do kill people, as well as crops and livestock; water shortages and/or floods; new plant diseases and pests; and seasonal changes that will affect crop viability. But as I commenced writing and remembered that long-forgotten day it dawned that there may be a more important point about what Chavez represents applied to climate change. Read More

Categories: Global Warming  

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