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A 2014 session of the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)—a crucial "dot" in a connected climate science narrative. Photo: IPCC (Flickr)

Connecting the Dots on Climate Science: The Importance of a Complete Science Narrative

Keith Daum, , UCS

In Walter M. Miller’s classic apocalyptic novel, A Canticle for Leibowitz, an atomic holocaust leaves the world in a modern version of the Dark Ages. In this post-apocalyptic world, books are burnt and cultural information destroyed by anti-intellectual mobs. The monks of a small knowledge-hoarding religious institution try to preserve, understand, and control what information remains. Read more >

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5 Things Congress Can Do to Help Communities Devastated by Hurricane Harvey

, director of gov't affairs, Climate & Energy

People need help and they don’t care about political or fiscal ideological purity. They need money and other support services so they can begin to rebuild their lives, and prevent future storm events from laying waste to the city again. So what can Congress do to help Houston and other communities devastated by Hurricane Harvey when they come back from August recess? Read more >

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Workers make repairs in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. Photo: US Coast Guard/Petty Officer 3rd Class Nathan Cox

We Must Protect the Workers Who Will Rebuild after Hurricane Harvey

, executive director

Safeguarding workers’ health and safety must not be an afterthought as Texas grapples with the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. Read more >

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Catastrophic Intensity: Why Is Hurricane Irma Gaining Strength So Quickly?

, climate scientist

UPDATE (September 8, 4:20 pm)—For more on this developing storm event, including how it compares to Hurricane Harvey, we’ve posted a round-up of expert and scientist perspectives: UCS Experts’ View of Risk and Preparedness as the Impacts of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma Mount.

UPDATE (September 7, 11:50 am)—Hurricane Irma currently remains a category 5 hurricane, feeding off abnormally warm waters along its path across the northeast Caribbean. The hurricane’s strength is expected to continue and it is forecast to remain a category 4 or 5 storm over the next several days (the National Hurricane Center is maintaining Irma as a category 5 until Friday).

Hurricane Irma’s 180-plus mph winds held for over 24 hours (currently nearly two days), setting a record for an Atlantic hurricane and leaving casualties and destruction on the French island territories, U.S and British Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico. Early on  September 7, Irma’s center was about 95 miles north of the Dominican Republic, moving at about 17 mph and expected to go north of the Dominican Republic and Haiti on Thursday, Turks & Caicos and the Bahamas by Thursday night, and then Cuba on Friday night/Saturday. After that, recent tracks show it heading towards Florida and the Eastern US coast; those tracks will keep being updated.

Regardless of its final path, there is a real threat of extreme storm surge—residents should heed the National Hurricane Center advisories and take recommended measures to ensure safety.


In a world that is increasingly defined by superlatives, let’s start with this just-released statement from the National Hurricane Center: Hurricane Irma is the strongest hurricane in the Atlantic basin outside of the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico in their records, and a potentially catastrophic one, tied for second place as the strongest ever in the Atlantic. And it is following on the footsteps of Hurricane Harvey, which gathered strength very fast and dumped record amounts of rain on Texas and Louisiana.

Read more >

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Protecting New Jersey From Sea Level Rise: The Future of the Meadowlands

During Hurricane Sandy in 2012, the Meadowlands wetlands absorbed much of the storm surge’s energy and saved lives and homes. Marshland in New Jersey. A case study part of the report When Rising Seas Hit Home, 2017. Read more >

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