Science and Democracy

The partnership between science and democracy has played a huge role in U.S. history. But misinformation and attacks on science have strained that partnership. UCS science and democracy experts keep you informed on the latest developments, from Capitol Hill to local communities.


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Latest Science and Democracy Posts

Congress vs. Trump: Are the President’s Anti-Science Budget Priorities Headed for Another Defeat?

, director of gov't affairs, Climate & Energy

Congress has already repudiated President Trump’s budget priorities once. So what does this mean for the 2018 budget? Read more >

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No Rest for the Sea-weary: Science in the Service of Continually Improving Ocean Management

Marissa Baskett, , UCS

Marine reserves, or no-fishing zones, are increasing throughout the world. Their goals are variable and numerous, often a mix of conserving our ocean’s biodiversity and supporting the ability to fish for seafood outside reserves for generations to come. California is one location that has seen the recent implementation of marine reserves, where the California Marine Life Protection Act led to the establishment of one of the world’s largest networks of marine reserves. Read more >

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One of Many Risks of the Regulatory Accountability Act: Flawed Risk Assessment Guidelines

, science and policy analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

Tomorrow, the Senate will begin marking up Senator Rob Portman’s version of the Regulatory Accountability Act (RAA), which my colleague Yogin wrote a primer about last week. This bill is an attempt to impose excessive burdens on every federal agency to freeze the regulatory process or otherwise tie up important science-based rules in years of judicial review. Read more >

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Five Ways to Move Beyond the March: A Guide for Scientists Seeking Strong, Inclusive Science

Alexandra E. Sutton Lawrence, Rae Wynn-Grant, Cynthia Malone, Eleanor Sterling, Martha Groom, and Mary Blair, , UCS

The March for Science took place April 22 in locations all over the world — an exciting time for scientist-advocates and a proud moment for the global scientific community. As we reflect on the March, we must also reflect on the fact that organization of the March on Science 2017 has been a microcosm of the structural, systemic challenges that scientists continue to face in addressing equity, access, and inclusion in the sciences. Read more >

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Shake, Rattle, and Rainout: Federal Support for Disaster Research

Joyce Levine, PhD, AICP, , UCS

Hurricanes, wildfires, and earthquakes are simply natural events—until humans get in their way. The resulting disasters are particularly devastating in urban areas, due to high concentrations of people and property. Losses from disasters have risen steadily over the past five decades, thanks to increased populations and urban development in high-hazard areas, particularly the coasts. There is also significant evidence that climate change is making weather-related events more frequent and more severe as well. As a result, it is more critical than ever that natural hazards research is being incorporated into emergency planning decisions. Read more >

Graphic: NOAA
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