Science and Democracy

The partnership between science and democracy has played a huge role in U.S. history. But misinformation and attacks on science have strained that partnership. UCS science and democracy experts keep you informed on the latest developments, from Capitol Hill to local communities.


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Latest Science and Democracy Posts

Why I March for Science: The Frightening Risks We Aren’t Talking About

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

“Thank you, Dr. Goldman. That was frightening.” Moderator Keesha Gaskins-Nathan said to me after I spoke last week as the only scientist at the Stetson University Law Review Symposium. My talk covered the ways that the role of science in federal decisionmaking is being degraded by the Trump administration, by Congress, and by corporate and ideological forces. Together these alarming moves are poised to damage the crucial role that science plays in keeping us all safe and healthy. This is why I will march for science this Saturday. Read more >

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Science Just Saved My Daughter—The Most Important Reason Why I #StandUpForScience

, Kendall Science Fellow

The morning of April 4, 2017 began with excitement. My family and I were ready to fly to Boston, where we were to meet up with friends and their children at the geography conference. Our five-month old baby Amaia had lost some weight and been all kinds of fussy over the last two weeks, so we stopped to see her doctor in the morning thinking she would get some antibiotics for a stomach bug and we would be on our way. Read more >

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Gas wells sprinkled across the (in)famous Jonah Field, one of the richest natural gas deposits in North America. Since the early 1990s, fracking has allowed drillers to tap into otherwise inaccessible deposits, and this sagebrush-covered steppe in west-central Wyoming is expected to support more than 3,000 wells before it is played out (painting by Travis Ivey).

Behind the Carbon Curtain: How the Energy Corporatocracy Censors Science

Jeffrey Lockwood, , UCS

In my forthcoming book, Behind the Carbon Curtain, The Energy Industry, Political Censorship and Free Speech (University of New Mexico Press), I tell the stories of scientists, artists and teachers who have been silenced by the collusion of energy corporations and public officials. My purpose is to provide witness, to record events, to give voice—and in so doing to shift the balance of power ever so slightly to bring us closer to a tipping point of outrage and change. Read more >

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Mori Point, Golden Gate National Recreation Area. Photo: National Park Service

Restoring California’s Coastal Ecosystems

Dr. Karen Holl, , UCS

Over two-thirds of Californians live in coastal counties. Californians love their coastline for good reasons—the mild weather, recreational opportunities, and of course their iconic beauty and natural diversity.

The California coastline hosts a variety of ecosystems ranging from sand dunes to rolling grasslands to mixed evergreen forests. These ecosystems not only are beautiful and provide habitat to many species of plants and animals, they also provide important services to people. Coastal wetlands, for example, help to improve water quality, reduce shoreline erosion, and buffer against sea level rise. Read more >

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Photo: New York Blood Center.

Safer Blood Products: One Researcher’s Story on Why Federal Support Matters

Dr. Bernie Horowitz, , UCS

In 1982, a crisis was beginning to unfold. Gay men were dying of an unknown cause, which years later was shown to be the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV).  At that time, I was not involved with the gay community, with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), or with HIV. But federal funding of my research on blood products helped us prevent the transmission of HIV and hepatitis to tens of thousands of Americans. Read more >

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