Science and Democracy

The partnership between science and democracy has played a huge role in U.S. history. But misinformation and attacks on science have strained that partnership. UCS science and democracy experts keep you informed on the latest developments, from Capitol Hill to local communities.


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Latest Science and Democracy Posts

Counting the Attacks on Science by the Trump Administration and Congress

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

Today the Union of Concerned Scientists launches a webpage to track attacks on science by the Trump Administration and the 115th Congress. The page will be consistently updated, and we’re planning to add a filter option to view the attacks by issue, agency, and type of attack (e.g. censorship, political interference, conflicts of interest, etc.). Read more >

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Secretary of Defense. James Mattis delivers his opening statement before the Senate Armed Services Committee at the confirmation hearing for him to become Secretary of Defense, January 12, 2017. Photo: C-Span Channel/YouTube.

Secretary of Defense James Mattis: The Lone Climate Change Soldier in this Administration’s Cabinet

, Climate Preparedness Specialist

Since the inauguration, we have witnessed President Trump filling his Cabinet with climate deniers and billionaires. As each day passed, the reality of what we can expect from this administration has become all too clear. But, Secretary of Defense James Mattis understands the impacts of climate change on national defense. How will James Mattis navigate his way in an anti-science, climate change denying administration? Read more >

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Protecting our nation’s workforce is not a partisan issue. If this president and this Congress say they stand with America’s workers, then it’s time to give meaning to those words.

Will Congress Turn Its Back on the Safety of America’s Workers?

, executive director

Update (March 22, 6:20 p.m.): Senate votes. Workers lose. On a straight party line vote, the Senate just repealed OSHA’s rule clarifying an employer’s obligation to maintain accurate records of serious injuries. According to the Congressional Review Act, the rule is now and forever gone unless Congress tells the agency to write it again–and there is fat chance of that happening anytime soon. This is a sad day for U.S. workers; another safeguard gone.


 

Let’s say someone you care about—mother, father, wife, husband, partner, son, daughter, friend, and neighbor—works in a facility that’s had a history of serious injuries or illnesses. You know, like burns, amputations, and broken bones that happen at work. Or head, eye, or back injuries. Or problems that send workers to emergency rooms, clinics, or doctors with breathing difficulties, skin damage, or other health issues related to chemical exposures or other dangerous conditions at work.  Read more >

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Who’s Marching for Science—and Why? Here Are 15 Answers

Alexander Zwissler, , UCS

While science and its impacts on beliefs and our world will always be the subject of debate, in general it has been accepted that the scientists themselves should largely stay on the sidelines. The recent election has triggered a reevaluation of this norm. Read more >

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How’s EPA’s Science Advice Process Doing? Celebrating Sunshine and Progress at the EPA

, science and policy analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

Happy sunshine week! It’s a week to celebrate one of the pillars of our democracy: access to information. This year’s sunshine week seems especially important because of the current Administration’s open hostility toward the media, which has been shining a light on the federal government’s operations day in and day out and illustrating the clear conflicts of interest of the corporate cabinet. Read more >

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