Science and Democracy

The partnership between science and democracy has played a huge role in U.S. history. But misinformation and attacks on science have strained that partnership. UCS science and democracy experts keep you informed on the latest developments, from Capitol Hill to local communities.


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Latest Science and Democracy Posts

The Arkema chemical facility in Crosby, Texas. Google Maps image.

As Arkema Plant Burns, Six Things We Know About Petrochemical Risks in the Wake of Harvey

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

As Harvey continues to wreak havoc in the Southeast, one issue is starting to emerge as a growing threat to public health and safety: Houston’s vast oil, gas, and chemical production landscape. We’ve already seen accidental releases of chemicals at facilities owned by ExxonMobil, Chevron, and others. Now we are seeing explosions at Arkema’s Crosby facility 20 miles northeast of Houston, due to power failures and flooding. And there remains a threat of additional explosions. Read more >

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Electric vehicle charging stations line the perimeter of San Francisco's City Hall. Photo: Bigstock.

Global Solutions Start at Home

Arti Garg, , UCS

“Think globally, act locally.”

I first heard this phrase as a child who had just learned about Earth Day at school. To my 11-year old self, it felt empowering; I could help the environment by recycling and conserving water. While the idea of taking action to solve pressing problems continued to inspire me through to adulthood, I’ve recently come to fully appreciate the importance of local action. Read more >

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Halting a National Academy of Sciences Study Is Unacceptable

, director, Center for Science & Democracy

I have been a participant in National Academy studies as a scientist, a recipient of their advice as a federal agency manager at NOAA, and involved in setting up studies as a board member. Last week was the first time that I have ever seen a study in progress halted. Read more >

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Comments Needed Now! The Trump Administration Might Revoke Vital Beryllium Protections

, executive director

In response to pressure from the construction and shipyard industries, OSHA decided to (once again) solicit stakeholder comments on whether its final beryllium rule should extend protections to workers in these two industries—despite decades of work, a lengthy rule-making process, and solid scientific evidence Read more >

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Sam Clovis speaks at a Rushmore Political Action Committee luncheon while campaigning for US Senate, Sioux City, Iowa, March 24, 2014. Credit: Jerry Mennenga/ZUMA Wire/ZUMAPRESS.com/Alamy Live News

Is Sam Clovis a Scientist? A Racist? 9 Questions the Senate Should Ask

, senior analyst, Food and Environment

Things are not going so well for President Trump’s nominee for the position of under secretary for research, education, and economics (REE) at the US Department of Agriculture. This job has responsibility for scientific integrity at the USDA, as well as oversight of the department’s various research arms and multi-billion dollar annual investments in agricultural research and education that are essential to farmers and eaters alike. The job also encompasses the role of USDA chief scientist, leading Congress in 2008 to emphasize that the person who fills it should actually be a scientist. But Sam Clovis is not one. And that’s not the half of it.

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