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Sugar-coating Science: How the Food Industry Misleads Consumers on Sugar

When I was growing up, my parents strictly limited the amount of sugar I was allowed to eat. I remember one day throwing a tantrum in the grocery store—I must have been 4 or 5—because my mother wouldn’t buy me Froot Loops. I shook the box up and down, transfixed by the big, colorful cartoon bird on the front, and wailed, “But I waaaaant it!” She snatched the box, “No way! The first ingredient is SUGAR.” Read More

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The Koch Brothers Can’t Switch Off Renewable Electricity

Despite relentless legislative attacks funded by the Koch Brothers and other fossil fuel special interest groups, state renewable electricity standards are holding their own and continue to drive investments in clean energy resources. And as long as legislators remain committed to well-informed policies that represent the will of the people instead of a few powerful special interests, renewable energy can continue to look forward to a bright future in the U.S. Read More

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Science & Democracy Dialogues: A New Series from the Center for Science and Democracy

This spring, the Center for Science and Democracy is launching a new series of informal, interactive online conversations. Although the technology is something we’re still experimenting with, these talks have already begun to forge connections between experts, early career scientists, activists, and others whose interests intersect at the nexus of science, policy, and society. Read More

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The U.S. National Climate Assessment: A Detailed Evaluation of the Scientific Evidence on Climate Change

We have heard a lot in the past few weeks about the latest international assessment of climate change impacts as new reports have been finalized by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Of course climate change is a global phenomenon occurring over decades and, for many, it is hard to relate to new information about global changes. But help is on the way! The third U.S. National Climate Assessment is scheduled for release on May 6. Read More

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Building Healthier Food Environments: Seven Organizations Making a Difference in Minnesota

What will it take to transform the food system we have in the United States today—with all its misaligned priorities, junk food, and diet-related diseases—into a healthier one for all Americans? That’s the subject of “Science, Democracy, and a Healthy Food Policy,” which UCS will co-host with the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health in Minneapolis on May 6-7. Read More

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The Power of Positive: Science Communication Lessons from Katharine Hayhoe

Our friend and long-time collaborator Katharine Hayhoe has been named one of TIME Magazine’s 100 most influential people. Obviously, it’s quite an honor and it’s one she richly deserves. To mark the occasion, I wanted to share some lessons about science communication I’ve learned from her that go beyond the basics. Read More

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Sometimes the Good Guys Win: Unmasking “Company Doe”

Last week a federal district appeals court issued a decision that is a victory for scientific integrity, transparency,  and consumer protection. Read More

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Transforming Food Policy Through Science from Coast to Coast

From Let’s Move! to farmers markets, the conversation about how public health science is informing and leading to healthier food policies and food environments is growing. And at every level, good things are happening. Leading up to the May 6 Science and Democracy Forum on “Science, Democracy, and a Healthy Food Policy,” we asked for examples of people using scientific and public health evidence to improve food environments. Here’s a flavor of some of the work highlighted in your responses: Read More

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Virginia Supreme Court Unanimously Supports Academic Freedom at the University of Virginia

The Supreme Court of Virginia today found unanimously in favor of the University of Virginia in its attempt to protect its employees from unwarranted intrusions into their privacy through the commonwealth’s Freedom of Information Act (VFOIA). In doing so, the Court rebuffed efforts by the American Tradition Institute (ATI) to gain access to the private correspondence of UVa researchers. The Court’s decision signals to scientists at public universities that the pursuit of scientific knowledge will be protected in Virginia, no matter how their research results might be received. Read More

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Spring Brings Hope–Even about Transparency and Accountability in Government

There is some good, albeit modest, news about the Food and Drug Administration and the way the agency addresses conflicts of interest on FDA advisory panels that consider the safety and efficacy of drugs and medical devices. Read More

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