Science Communication

How can scientists make their expertise heard over the din of misinformation? It’s a good question—and our science communication experts have answers.


Subscribe to our Science Communication feed

Latest Science Communication Posts

From Academia to Advocacy and Back: The Importance of Translating Research into Policy

, food systems & health analyst

Sadly, this will be my last post as an analyst for the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS).  I came to UCS in Washington, DC immediately after obtaining my PhD in 2014. Two years later, I’m coming full circle, returning to the world of academia—with a new understanding and appreciation for how my research can have an impact in the policy world.

Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Berkeley Breathed, and the Great Barrier Reef: What’s Worth Reading This Week

, program manager, Center for Science & Democracy

This has been quite the week. From the overwhelming to the fascinating to the touching, here’s what I’ve found worth reading: Read more >

Bookmark and Share

The Trouble with Science Funding

, lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

“We should acknowledge the elephant in the room” one panelist said.

Last week I attended a half-day event put on by Scientific American.  The topic was media coverage of scientific topics and the “elephant” was the event’s corporate sponsorship. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

How Is the USDA Doing on Scientific Integrity?

, lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

In March 2013, the US Department of Agriculture updated its scientific integrity policy, a policy mandated by the Obama Administration for all federal agencies with a significant focus on science. Along with 22 other agencies and departments, the USDA developed a policy in 2011 that the Union of Concerned Scientists assessed to “not make adequate commitments to scientific integrity.” How does the revised policy measure up and does it appear to be working? Read more >

Bookmark and Share