Science Communication

How can scientists make their expertise heard over the din of misinformation? It’s a good question—and our science communication experts have answers.


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Latest Science Communication Posts

Congress is Trying to Protect Federal Scientists Because President Trump Isn’t

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

Today members of the Senate, led by Senator Bill Nelson, introduced a bill to strengthen scientific integrity in federal decision making. If ever there was a time that such a bill is needed, it is now. Read more >

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Communicating Science: Breaking Through Our Comfortable Silence to Form Meaningful Connections

Sabah Ul-Hasan, , UCS

Those who knew me prior to age of 17 probably anticipated I’d become a scientist. I held all the stereotypical personality traits of being weird, antisocial, and a tad eccentric back then. With my hombre highlights and loud persona, few new people I casually encounter today at, say, the grocery store suspect I enjoy spending at least eight hours examining microbial sequence data, synthesizing predictive models, and writing grant applications. It’s meditative. And though I’ve become a go-to socialite in my circles, I still wouldn’t label myself as an extrovert. To me I’m simply doing my job, being open and approachable to promote information accessibility.
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Photo: Roy Luck/CC BY 2.0 (Flickr)

Breaking Up (with Stuff) is Hard to Do: Are We Biologically Predisposed to Collect Stuff?

Mary Poffenroth, , UCS

Have you ever wondered why we enjoy stuff so much? We definitely enjoy buying it. Depending on what it is, we also enjoy talking about it. We research it, we browse for it, and we feel triumphant when we find that perfect something. But why? Read more >

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Antennas of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array

Celebrating Science and Hispanic Heritage Month: A Conversation with Hector Arce

, Deputy director, Center for Science & Democracy

Diversity strengthens science. It’s more than just a matter of fairness and equity—diverse groups of people create better science. Yet it should come as no surprise that people of color continue to be underrepresented in science and engineering. Some people and organizations are doing their best to change that. Read more >

Photo: European Southern Observatory/CC-BY 4.0
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