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The National Flood Insurance Program Must Be Improved: 5 Ways to Promote Climate Resilience

, lead economist and climate policy manager

If you own a home along the coast or elsewhere in a floodplain, you may have heard of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). What you may not know is that this program doesn’t just provide insurance; it is also critical for how we assess risks and help protect people and property in flood-prone areas.

The NFIP is up for Congressional re-authorization in September 2017, and it’s time to consider changes that would make the program work better, especially in light of growing development in floodplains and climate change. Read more >

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Planning Failures: A Story of Unintended Consequences

, climate scientist

What happens when planned actions or policies have the best intentions, but backfire somehow? Well, planning failures are like that, especially when the variety known as maladaptation. And when it relates to climate change, maladaptative policies often backfire in very specific ways. Read more >

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NY-MA Doubleheader on Clean Energy is a Game Changer

, president

The rivalry between New York and Massachusetts is famous: Yankees vs. Red Sox, Giants vs. Patriots, Wall Street vs. Harvard/MIT, glamour vs. provincial charm. Last week, New York and Massachusetts competed to be the Northeast clean energy leader. And in this case, they both won. Actually, we all did. Read more >

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This National Farmers Market Week, Let’s Celebrate the Low-Hanging Fruit—and Then Reach Higher

, Fellow, Food & Environment Program

It’s rare to come across a policy that’s actually a win-win: something that does measurable good at the political or financial expense of virtually no one. These policies are truly low-hanging fruit, so obvious that we should feel embarrassed for not enacting them sooner.

One such policy is the recent decision in Los Angeles requiring that all farmers markets accept Electronic Benefit Transfer, or EBT—the debit card used to redeem food stamps (now called SNAP, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program). Read more >

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