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LA Metro Bus. Photo: Jimmy O'Dea

LA Metro’s Opportunity to Lead

, vehicles analyst

Update, August 3rd 2017: LA Metro committed to 100% zero-emission buses by 2030! This is a big win for clean air and local jobs! Here’s the resolution.

Today, Los Angeles Metro, the second largest transit agency in the United States, will vote on a plan to transition its fleet to zero-emission buses. If this sounds familiar, you’re right. It looked as though Metro would vote on this in June, but the vote got bumped to July.

Leading up to last month’s vote, Joel Espino from The Greenlining Institute and I blogged about the importance of this commitment and Metro’s leadership on clean vehicles. Metro’s decision will impact Los Angeles’ efforts to clean the air, fight climate change, and expand economic opportunity. We applaud the proposal put forward by Metro staff to transition the entire fleet to zero-emission vehicles.

So what else has happened in electric bus news this past month? Let’s catch up:

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Photo: Partners Healthcare

Climate and Energy in the Health Care Sector: An Interview with Bill Ravanesi

, senior energy analyst, Clean Energy

Health care has been in the headlines a whole lot lately, and it’s never far from our minds or wallets. It’s never far from our lungs or hearts, either—or, it turns out, our energy choices. How we make electricity, and what happens to our climate, have big implications for human health.

Our health care sector isn’t taking those connections lightly. Here’s what one expert had to say about how Massachusetts institutions are leading the way on connecting the dots. Read more >

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Space observations help monitor toxic algal blooms that affect shellfish in Maine. Photo: Henry Zbyszynski CC-BY-2.0 (Flickr).

Maine Benefits From Space Observations: Will Congress Axe Them?

, senior climate scientist

The U.S. House of Representatives appropriations committee approved of a budget that, according to figures my colleague Hannah Nesser calculated, includes over a quarter cut from NOAA’s National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) Systems Acquisition funding compared to previous fiscal year enacted level.  What exactly is on the chopping block for this and other cuts to NOAA and NASA?  Are any vital to key economic sectors in Maine?

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Photo by Erika Spanger-Siegfried
NESDIS/NOAA
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Lessons for Fighting the Trump Administration’s Attacks on Science

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

With all the recent headlines about the Trump administration’s attacks on the government scientific enterprise—from dismissing scientists from advisory committees, to hiring untrained or conflicted heads of agencies, to blatant misinformation from administration officials—it can be difficult to think about the solutions. But we must. My new paper, out this week in Conservation Biology, does just that.  Read more >

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The Native Village of Shishmaref, viewed from the northeast side of Sarichef Island. Photo: Eli Keene

Rising Seas Erode Homes and History in Alaska—Let’s Talk Relocation

Victoria Herrmann , UCS

Climate change is amplified in the Arctic, and many coastal communities are talking relocation. The cost of relocation, often emphasized, is just a small part of the story–for these communities moving means losing a common history, a way of life and their identity. Read more >

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