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Solar Energy Soars, Now Generates Enough Power for More than Two Million Homes

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The latest solar numbers have just come in, and the celebration continues. The latest industry report shows another 4,751 megawatts (MW) went in during 2013, with great progress for both photovoltaics (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP). Solar in the U.S. now generates enough to power over 2 million average households.

The figures are from the just-released SEIA/GTM Solar Market Insight 2013 report, a treasure trove of data and, well, insights (including a factsheet and an infographic). The tip of the 2013 solar info iceberg:

Solar soaring: healthy donuts from coast to coast, and plenty of places in between (Source: SEIA/GTM)

Solar soaring: Healthy donuts from coast to coast, and plenty of places in between (Source: SEIA/GTM)

Top stats

  • Installations in 2013 were 41% higher than installations during 2012, itself a record-breaking year.
  • The U.S. has gotten more solar installed in the last 18 months than in the previous 30 years combined.
  • Q4 2013 was by far the best quarter ever.
  • New installations increased U.S. CSP capacity by 80%, to 918 MW.
  • Costs keep dropping: average PV system prices fell another 15% in 2013.

Top states

Steady as she goes: Q4 is always good, but 2013 took the cake (Source: SEIA/GTM)

Steady as she goes: Q4 is always good, but 2013’s took the cake (Source: SEIA/GTM)

  • California led the nation again, accounting for more than half of the new capacity.
  • But the numbers have lots to say about lots of states, including North Carolina, which grew 171%, and Georgia, which grew a pack-leading 762%.
  • For utility PV installations, three states — Arizona, California, and North Carolina — accounted for 87%.
  • Six states got 100% of their new generating capacity from solar; nationwide, solar was behind only natural gas for capacity additions.

And more growth is clearly coming. The CSP figures above don’t count the largest solar plant in the world, which went online in California last month. And the report predicts 2014 solar installations of almost 6,000 MW, with growth fastest in the residential sector.

Blue skies are here, and ahead.

 

Posted in: Energy Tags: , , ,

About the author: John Rogers is a senior energy analyst with expertise in renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies and policies. He co-manages the Energy and Water in a Warming World Initiative (EW3) at UCS that looks at water demands of energy production in the context of climate change. He holds a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan and a bachelor's degree from Princeton University. See John's full bio.

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  • http://www.solar-hot-water.ca Bruce Gray

    This is truly exciting news to hear solar is growing at rates that double each year.

    A big breakthrough rolling out now is a hybrid Solar + Heat Pump, called SunPump that heats/cools floors and hot water, independent of the weather and even at night. This is the first solar heating/cooling and hot water appliance to function as a primary heating system for 100% of the load and 24/7.

    • http://www.ucsusa.org/about/staff/staff/john-rogers.html John Rogers

      Thanks, Bruce. It’s exciting to see the range of technologies that emerge when and where we get the policies right and allow the market to do its thing. For solar, it ranges from PV and CSP to solar water and space heating — and technologies that bridge that range. Good stuff.

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