adaptation


A Honduran farmer digs irrigation channels in advance of maize planting.
A maize farmer near Alauca, Honduras, digs irrigation channels in advance of maize planting. Photo: Neil Palmer, CIAT/CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 - Flickr

Making Agriculture “Climate-Smart” in Latin America and the Caribbean

Sharon Gourdji, , UCS

I recently returned to the United States from Cali, Colombia where I worked for the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (or CIAT, its Spanish-language abbreviation) for a couple years. CIAT is part of a global network of 15 agricultural research centers in the CGIAR (Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research), which have traditionally focused on crop breeding to raise yields of staple crops around the world.  Read more >

Photo: Neil Palmer, CIAT/CC BY-NC-SA 2.0, Flickr
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The Conspicuous Absence of Climate Change in New Mexico’s State Water Planning

, senior climate scientist

One might expect a state like New Mexico, where water is such a precious resource, to pay close attention to climate projections and to plan carefully for its future water security. Unfortunately, this does not appear to be the case. Read more >

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Inner Resilience: Connecting Heart, Mind and Faith

Dr. Katharine Hayhoe and Dr. Emily Powell, , UCS

Storm surges flooding a low-lying Pacific island; Arctic villages toppling on the edge of an eroded coastline; relentless downpours destroying homes and livelihoods in India—wherever we live, whatever our values, culture, or politics, climate change impacts intensify the need for resilience. Supporting resilience and adaptation of human communities and ecosystems is an important focus of the climate talks. Yet a new type of resilience, one that we may be less inclined to think about, has become part of the conversations—that of inner resilience. Read more >

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On Katrina, My Family, And Knowing The Big One Was Coming

, former scientist and Kendall Science Fellow

Hurricane Katrina devastated my home city of New Orleans in 2005, taking lives and erasing dreams. And it changed the fabric of the city.

The losses experienced from Katrina were partly due to the strength of the storm and also partly due to engineers’ underestimation of what a storm of this magnitude could do. Inadequate planning also played a role in the impacts faced by New Orleans.

The truth, however, is that Katrina could have been worse. Read more >

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