Advocacy


From Academia to Advocacy and Back: The Importance of Translating Research into Policy

, food systems & health analyst

Sadly, this will be my last post as an analyst for the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS).  I came to UCS in Washington, DC immediately after obtaining my PhD in 2014. Two years later, I’m coming full circle, returning to the world of academia—with a new understanding and appreciation for how my research can have an impact in the policy world.

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Dear Tomorrow: An Open Letter to My Son on Climate Change and His Future

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

Dear Thomas,

In the five months you’ve been on this Earth, I already love you more than I can describe in words. I want nothing but a perfectly happy life for you, a life with every opportunity possible. I’m working hard to make sure you have those opportunities. Read more >

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Part-Time Activism for the Busy Expert: A Molecular Biologist’s Tale

Christopher Boniface, Molecular Biologist
, , UCS

I remember the first really large protest I ever attended. I was 21 and it was on the eve of the invasion of Iraq.  The atmosphere was electric—all over the U.S. and around the world, people were out in the streets in massive numbers telling their leaders, “No War!” The eventual invasion and occupation of Iraq was a wake-up call to me about the decision-making abilities of our leaders. It moved me to action on other issues that I care about—especially the environment.  Read more >

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Editorial Writers Consider the Water Crisis, Informed by UCS Experts

, sr. Washington rep., Center for Science & Democracy

I was in Newport, Rhode Island for a conference of the Association of Opinion Journalists October 13 through 16. It was wonderful to escape the fog of Capitol Hill and be in the company of rational, thoughtful people who did not dispute the reality of human-caused climate change. Read more >

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Tulips, Tyranny…and Gratitude

, sr. Washington rep., Center for Science & Democracy

It’s springtime in Washington, my favorite season in our nation’s capitol. The cherry blossoms have faded, but the bright red tulips are standing erect like soldiers in Lafayette Park, across from the White House. The streets are clogged with tourists and school groups, taking pictures, looking at the monuments, a bit dazzled by Washington’s beauty. Read more >

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