agriculture


You Are What You Eat—And What It Eats Too

Liz Carlisle
, , UCS

A dozen years ago, a New York Times Magazine article titled “Power Steer” changed the way Americans thought about meat. “We are what we eat, it is often said,” wrote author Michael Pollan, “but of course that is only part of the story. We are what what we eat eats too.” Read more >

Bookmark and Share

We’re Number One! – In What Our Land Can Do for the World’s Climate

, sr. scientist & dir., Climate Research and Analysis

You hear the phrase “we’re number one!” from Americans fairly often, usually in relation to sports or politics. Now new research from the Union of Concerned Scientists shows  that there’s another domain where it applies. It’s not as an assertion of superiority, and probably never will lead to a chant at the Olympics, the World Cup or even the UN climate negotiations. Rather, it’s in terms of our potential to use our land sector – that is, agriculture and forests – to reduce our global warming pollution and avoid the worst consequences of climate change.

Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Agriculture + Ecology: No Matter What You Call It, the Science of “Agroecology” Adds Up

, agroecologist

As a child of America’s Dairyland and conservationist Aldo Leopold’s home (yes, that would be Wisconsin), I always loved how agriculture and ecology dominated the scenery. Driving through the state, though, I usually only spotted those two vistas out opposite windows. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Why Does Good Produce Cost So Much?

, , food systems & health analyst

During the summer of 2012, I was hard at work finishing data collection for my doctoral dissertation. While pursuing my degree in Health Policy and Management, I had just spent the last year traveling around North Carolina asking lower-income women what their thoughts were on access to healthy food. Not surprisingly, produce prices were always the first topic to come up. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Amazon Deforestation in Brazil: New Numbers, Better Understanding

, sr. scientist & dir., Climate Research and Analysis

The new annual data on Amazon deforestation in Brazil has just come out, and it’s good news. For the latest year—August 2013 through July 2014—the annual total was 4,848 square kilometers. That’s 18 percent less than in the previous year, and the second-lowest figure ever. Read more >

Bookmark and Share