Arctic


Thawing Permafrost: Why It Matters

, senior climate scientist

In these recent hot summer days, as my colleague Xinnan Zhu was walking outside exposed to the outdoor temperature of nearly 100°F, she felt like she was going to melt like an ice cube under the sun. Read more >

Photo by Xinnan Zhu
International Permafrost Association, 1998. Circumpolar Active-Layer Permafrost System (CAPS), version 1.0.
Figure created by Xinnan Zhu in July, 2016.
NASA GISS data.giss.nasa.gov/gistemp/maps
Figure created by Xinnan Zhu from data in IPCC AR5
Figure created by Xinnan Zhu from data in IPCC AR5
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Beyond Heat Waves: What Does 14 Months in a Row of Record Heat Say About Global Warming? Five Key Points to Keep in Mind

, climate scientist

Every single month in 2016 so far had record warm temperatures for that month. It is no surprise then – again – that it is sure looking like 2016 will be the warmest year ever. Read more >

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Anchorage Event a Great Warm-Up for Fort Lauderdale

Dr. Colin Polsky, Director
, , UCS

While the Arctic Council normally meets at a table with only eight chairs, the US has invited world leaders, researchers, and media to a party that promises to be standing room only. Read more >

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Obama, Kerry and Ministers Meet in Alaska: Why the Arctic Matters

, senior climate scientist

President Obama plans to address ministers and experts from 20 nations at the U.S. State Department conference on Global Leadership in the Arctic: Cooperation, Innovation, Engagement, and Resilience (GLACIER) at the end of August. According to a White House official, President Obama is the first sitting U.S. President to visit Alaska’s Arctic. In a video about his upcoming trip to Alaska, the President pronounced, “As long as I am President, America will lead the world to meet this threat before it’s too late.”

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Arctic Sea Ice Thins as Old Thick Ice Rapidly Disappears

, , climate scientist

Last week brought news of yet another alarming season for sea ice in the Arctic. The National Snow and Ice Data Center announced the Arctic sea ice coverage for winter was the fifth lowest maximum on record. The extent of ice was more than 280,000 square miles below the 30-year average for 1981-2010. That’s an area just bigger than the size of Texas missing. Read more >

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