CDC


4 Ways to Discuss Congressional Budget Riders at the Dinner Table this Thanksgiving

, researcher, Center for Science & Democracy

Holiday gatherings with the family can be awkward, especially if you aren’t prepared for the inevitable table talk. Feeling like you don’t have enough fodder to sustain a conversation at the Thanksgiving dinner table this month?

Fret not! Every year around this time, my colleagues write about the budget process as the clock ticks for Congress to pass a clean budget – that is, a budget free from “poison pill” policy provisions and seemingly innocuous regulatory process riders that would hamper agencies from utilizing the best available science in rulemaking. These anti-science riders are extraneous special interest policies tacked onto a must-pass spending bill, a sort of parasitic mutualism, if you will. Read more >

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How the Senate Healthcare Bill Bolsters the Tanning Industry’s Misinformation Campaign

, science and policy analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

The American Suntanning Association (ASA) and the Indoor Tanning Association (ITA) are trade organizations representing the interests of indoor tanning manufacturers, suppliers and salon owners. The product that these trade organizations sell to customers is artificial UV radiation. The ASA has called itself a “science-first organization” and spouts off so-called scientific information on their website, TanningTruth.com, designed to correct “misinformation” about the harms of indoor sun tanning. Read more >

Photo: Marco Vertch/CC BY 2.0 (Wikimedia)
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Thank a Government Scientist Today. Their Work—and Our Health and Safety—Is Under Attack.

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

Today President Trump signed an executive order mandating that for any new rule issued from an agency, two would have to be revoked. Such a proposal is absurd, illogical, and threatening to our public health and safety.

Last week, the Trump administration also issued a government-wide hiring freeze, instituted a far-reaching gag-order, and stopped the normal flow of grants and contracts issuance at federal agencies. All of these actions were major hindrances to government employees’ ability to do their jobs.

Actions like these affect us all. When it comes to science-based agencies and the scientists that work there, it is worth reminding ourselves of the crucial role they play in in our daily lives.

Here are six reasons you should thank a government scientist today: Read more >

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Why You Should Be Paying Attention to the Upcoming Budget Fight

, Washington representative, Center for Science and Democracy

When it comes to Congress, we know that budgets are about more than just money. Back in April, I warned that we shouldn’t let the federal budget process become a playground for special interests. Basically, with little to no debate, policymakers will exploit the process and attempt to sneak in harmful, ideological provisions that undermine the use of science in the policymaking process and help rig the system for special interests. Read more >

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CDC’s Efforts to Combat Zika in Puerto Rico Hampered by a Legacy of Mistrust

, Kendall Science Fellow

Effectively combating emerging climate and health threats requires public trust in science and the scientific institutions charged with protecting us. When that trust is breached through negligence or outright malicious intent and the lives of people are compromised, public distrust grows, hurting the ability of public health agencies to protect us. Read more >

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