child nutrition


Trump Administration Claims ‘No Evidence’ Afterschool Programs and Meals Work. Actually, There’s Plenty.

, Food Systems & Health Analyst

When I sat down with Dr. Jacqueline Blakely to talk about her afterschool program at Sampson Webber Academy in Detroit, our conversation was interrupted. A lot. Parents dropped by to talk about their kids, kids dropped in to talk about their days, and the phone rang like clockwork. It didn’t take long for me to understand that there was something really good going on in this classroom. Read more >

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Concerned Parents Dish on New Added Sugar Label

, science and policy analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

I was curious about what parents of young children had to say about the FDA’s new Nutrition Facts labeling rule, particularly the “added sugars” information. So I asked a few of my ‘concerned parent’ colleagues at UCS about FDA’s recent action and what it’s like navigating grocery store aisles with children’s health in mind. Read more >

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Healthiest Nation by 2030? Not Without Healthier Women and Children Today

, science and policy analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

The American Public Health Association has focused its advocacy attention and this year’s National Public Health Week on making the United States the healthiest nation in one generation, by 2030. I have to admit I was skeptical when I first heard this announcement. Read more >

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Neighborhood Ministries: Putting Food on the Table and People to Work

, food systems & health analyst

In Ohio, more than 1 in 4 children lack access to nutritious food and are food insecure. In Youngstown, where nearly 40.2% of all residents and 66.6% of children live below the federal poverty level, an organization is working to combat childhood food insecurity. Read more >

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Who’s Against Healthy School Lunches for Kids? (No Really, Who Is?)

, senior analyst, Food and Environment

Debates about child nutrition and the quality of taxpayer-subsidized school lunches are heating up in the nation’s capital. Last week, the Partnership for a Healthier America (the non-profit spin-off of the First Lady’s “Let’s Move” initiative) held its annual summit here. And this week, the School Nutrition Association, a trade group representing 55,000 school food service professionals, is holding a DC conference complete with “lunch ladies” lobbying members of Congress. Sounds great, right? Read more >

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