climate change impacts


The Navy Understands Climate Change Is a Grave National Security Issue – Will the Nominee for Secretary of the Navy?

, Climate Preparedness Specialist

March 2, 2017 Update:

This past Sunday, February 26, 2017, Mr. Philip Bilden withdrew his name from consideration for the Secretary of Navy citing difficulties in “separating himself from his business interests.” This comes just one month after the White House nominated Bilden on January 25 and after the Secretary of Army nominee Mr. Vincent Viola withdrew his name on February 3, stating similar challenges of separating his business interests. Both billionaires, it is of little surprise that Mr. Viola and Mr. Bilden have insurmountable conflicts of interest that have forced each of them to withdraw their names from consideration. Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis’ statement last Sunday indicates that he will recommend a new nominee for Secretary of Navy in the coming days.

As the Secretary of the Navy, Mr. Bilden will lead and manage the hundreds of thousands of sailors, Marines and civilians and oversee the under secretary, four assistant secretaries, and a general counsel. In his role as Secretary of the Navy, Bilden will be stepping into a now well-established record of the Navy leading the Military on climate change science and action. Read more >

USNI
The Union of Concerned Scientists
Photo: Ian Swoveland
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California Floods Remind Us To Make Agricultural Water Conservation a Top Priority

, Kendall Science Fellow

Yes, you’ve been reading the headlines correctly the last few weeks. There’s been so much rain in drought-stricken California that excess water has led to flooded homes, damaged roads, dangerous mudslides and tragically, several fatalities. To make matters worse, the abundant rainfall hasn’t even cured the state’s current woes. Read more >

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Is Soil a Secret Weapon? On Agriculture and Climate Adaptation

, Kendall Science Fellow

“The oldest task in human history. To live on a piece of land without spoiling it.” Read more >

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On Katrina, My Family, And Knowing The Big One Was Coming

, former scientist and Kendall Science Fellow

Hurricane Katrina devastated my home city of New Orleans in 2005, taking lives and erasing dreams. And it changed the fabric of the city.

The losses experienced from Katrina were partly due to the strength of the storm and also partly due to engineers’ underestimation of what a storm of this magnitude could do. Inadequate planning also played a role in the impacts faced by New Orleans.

The truth, however, is that Katrina could have been worse. Read more >

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Crazy Hot Days, Crazy Warm Nights: A New Study on Climate Change in California’s Central Valley

, former scientist and Kendall Science Fellow

Last week I, along with an international group of scientists, published a study in the journal Climatic Change in which we found that the hottest summer days (24 hour periods) in the Central Valley were twice as likely to occur due to climate change. Heat waves in California’s Central Valley have become progressively more severe in recent decades due to  higher humidity and warmer nighttime temperatures. Observations obtained from NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center show that Central Valley nighttime temperatures were nearly 2°F (1°C) warmer in the 2000s compared to the 1901-1960 average and even higher for the whole of California (see plot below). Read more >

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