Join
Search

Posts Tagged ‘climate-change’

Warming Trends in the Pacific Northwest Are Not Due to Natural Variability

During the past several weeks, my phone weather alert has repeatedly shown Corvallis and Portland, Oregon, having fire and low humidity alerts. I did my postdoc there and remember the smell of burning woods during August and September. There have been record-setting wildfires this year in the Pacific Northwest and climate scientists argue that climate change is likely to make it worse due to increasing temperatures. Read More

Bookmark and Share

Hershey Bars, Global Warming and Deforestation: a Sweet New Policy

As I rode on the train back to Washington today, The Hershey Company announced its strengthened commitment to zero deforestation for all the palm oil it uses. This is another of the welcome corporate statements, over the last several months and indeed the last few days, that have recognized business’ responsibilities to reduce the damage that they cause to the climate. Read More

Bookmark and Share

Misleading New York Times Op-Ed on Forests, but Real Progress on Ending Deforestation

I’m in New York City for the United Nations Climate Summit, and it’s an important week for tropical forests and the global climate. Read More

Bookmark and Share

The Climate Summit in New York: Not an End, but a Beginning

On September 23 all eyes will be on New York City as more than 160 heads of state and other senior government officials come to the United Nations for a summit focused on a single issue: the need for effective action to confront the mounting threat of climate change.

Read More

Bookmark and Share

Confronting the Climate Impacts to Rocky Mountain Forests: From the Statistical to the Visceral

I was in Colorado a short time ago to release “Rocky Mountain Forests at Risk,” our latest report on the regional impacts of climate change. The report focuses on how climate change has amplified the effects of tree-killing insects, wildfires, and stress from heat and drought — what we called a “triple assault” — on forests. But my work on the report didn’t prepare me for the scene that confronted me on the ground.  Read More

Bookmark and Share

Climate, Carbon, and Clarity

Guest Bogger

Christopher Gambino, Ph.D. Candidate
Nitrogen Systems: Policy-oriented Integrated Research and Education (NSPIRE) IGERT Fellow, Washington State University

Pullman, WA

I’m as passionate as anyone about the reality of climate change (no really, it’s real) and the need to adapt now to its threats and alleviate the major drivers. Yet, as our nation and its leaders narrow the debate around one particular cause, vital sign, metric, or goal, we fall short in truly protecting and preserving our world for future generations. Read More

Bookmark and Share

Connecting the Dots: Drought, Climate Change, and Groundwater Regulation

UCS California Climate Scientist Dr. Juliet Christian-Smith provides this guest blog that celebrates today’s signing of historic California legislation to require regulation of groundwater, and offers some thoughts about the need for climate-resilient water management going forward.

Although California is known as a leader when it comes to climate change, its approach to groundwater has been more reminiscent of the Wild West. Groundwater provides around 60 percent of the state’s water supply in dry years, but it has remained largely unregulated since the Gold Rush era. Today, California took a major leap forward into the 21st century as Governor Jerry Brown signed two bills into law aimed at protecting groundwater for current and future generations. Read More

Bookmark and Share

Why Are Latinos Way Ahead of the Climate Change Curve?

In the summer of 2009 I had a unique opportunity in my young professional career. I gave several lectures on climate change and society at various venues in Guayaquil, Ecuador. There was a common theme throughout my talks: the audience accepted climate science and strongly felt that they had to act. This sentiment was shared by people with varied backgrounds, from architects to soybean farmers to students. Read More

Categories: Global Warming  

Tags:   

Bookmark and Share

Birds, Solar Power, and the Future of Renewable Energy in California

It’s an exciting time for solar, as UCS recently communicated its new report, Solar Power on the Rise. But with any strong surge in an emerging industry, unintended consequences crop up that must be addressed. Read More

Bookmark and Share

Charles Mann and The Atlantic Miss The Mark in a Confused Climate Change Piece

A recent climate change article by Charles C. Mann in The Atlantic left me scratching my head. The title, “How to Talk About Climate Change So People Will Listen” piqued my interest. It’s something I grapple with every day. But instead of focusing on how our public conversations about climate change are shifting, he lingers on what he sees as failed efforts to enact national climate policy. Mann is a serious and respected writer — who happens to work with some of my favorite magazines — so this piece felt like a missed opportunity. Read More

Bookmark and Share