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Posts Tagged ‘climate-change’

Water, Climate, and You: the 2014 National Climate Assessment

Today we expect to have water flowing at our kitchen sink and our food supplied by farms with sufficient water. The 2014 National Climate Assessment, released today, points to opportunities and challenges with the U.S. water resource infrastructure. Read More

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The Koch Brothers Can’t Switch Off Renewable Electricity

Despite relentless legislative attacks funded by the Koch Brothers and other fossil fuel special interest groups, state renewable electricity standards are holding their own and continue to drive investments in clean energy resources. And as long as legislators remain committed to well-informed policies that represent the will of the people instead of a few powerful special interests, renewable energy can continue to look forward to a bright future in the U.S. Read More

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Global Agriculture As Part of the Climate Solution

For quite a while, agriculture was dismissed as a possible way to mitigate climate change, because it’s where our food comes from, and we can’t live without food. From this obvious fact came the misinterpretation that we couldn’t cut agricultural greenhouse gas emissions without threatening food security. Read More

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The U.S. National Climate Assessment: A Detailed Evaluation of the Scientific Evidence on Climate Change

We have heard a lot in the past few weeks about the latest international assessment of climate change impacts as new reports have been finalized by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Of course climate change is a global phenomenon occurring over decades and, for many, it is hard to relate to new information about global changes. But help is on the way! The third U.S. National Climate Assessment is scheduled for release on May 6. Read More

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Spring Break in Florida: A Lesson in the Costs of Climate Change

One of the country’s favorite Spring Break destinations is facing an uncertain future. The longest maintained tide stations in the state indicate that seas at Florida shores have risen 8 to 9.5 inches per 100 years. High tides alone are frequently flooding low-lying areas. Four hundred football field’s worth of sand disappears each year from the beaches we love. Read More

Categories: Global Warming  

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Power Outages, Extreme Weather, and Climate Change: How Smart Energy Choices Will Help Keep the Lights On

Our nation’s aging electricity system is increasingly vulnerable to extreme weather events — including flooding, extreme heat, drought, and wildfires — which often cause power outages. Today UCS released a new report called Power Failure, which describes how extreme weather events are likely to increase in the future as global temperatures continue to rise, with major consequences for the electricity sector. Read More

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Cows Are the Real Hogs: The IPCC and the Demand Side of Agriculture

One small but important breakthrough in the new IPCC report on climate mitigation, released Sunday in Berlin, is that the chapter on agriculture, forest, and other land use (AFOLU) looks at the demand side, not just supply. In other words, it not only asks how we can create less global warming pollution in producing food and wood products, but also what kinds of food and wood products we ought to be producing and consuming if we want to avoid catastrophic climate change. Read More

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Why Should We Conserve Southeast Asia’s Peat Swamp Forests?

Guest Bogger

David S. Wilcove, Professor & Xingli Giam, Ph.D. candidate
Princeton University

Princeton, New Jersey

A fetid swamp filled with dangerous animals and diseases.  A vast expanse of muck serving no useful purpose.  A century ago, that was the way people viewed the Everglades in the United States, and they went about ditching and draining this amazing wetland until much of it had been converted to “useful” cropland and pastures, and the wildlife had been decimated.  Read More

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Top 5 Ways the Latest IPCC Review of Climate Change Reflects the U.S. Experience

Reading the summary of the IPCC report on climate impacts, I was struck by the parallels between the major findings and the observed trends in the U.S. Read More

Categories: Global Warming  

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The Ocean’s Cooling Effect: An Air Conditioner for the Planet

The tropical Pacific Ocean has been acting as a type of air conditioner for the planet during the past decade and a half by slowing the rate of global warming. Recent research suggests that the “speed bump” is in large part due to cooler-than-average sea surface temperatures. Read More

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