climate-change


hurricane-matthew-100416
Photo: NASA

Matthew Is the Most Powerful Atlantic Hurricane in a Generation. Here’s What You Need to Know.

, climate scientist

This is a gravely serious storm. Many of today’s East Coast residents have never experienced a hurricane of this magnitude and power, nor much considered the risks. Now they have a matter of hours to prepare. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Climate Policy: Physical Reliability vs Economic Philosophy

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

As states get serious about reducing climate-harming carbon pollution, their decisions will guide how the electrical grid changes, for better or worse. These decisions are central to the people who actually plan and manage the grid—the grid operators—who have shown varying degrees of willingness to embrace a clean energy economy. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Designing Infrastructure with Climate Change in Mind: Assembly Bill 2800 Becomes Law

, Western states senior climate analyst

It’s no secret that our aging infrastructure is long overdue for a serious upgrade. Recently, this issue received national attention when the presidential candidates from both major parties committed to significant capital investments to improve our infrastructure system. Read more >

California Department of Water Resources
California Department of Transportation
Bookmark and Share

csd-blog-cleveland-skyline

Cleveland Can Beat the Heat by Planting Trees—But Don’t Forget Environmental Justice

, Kendall Science Fellow

Climate change presents many threats to cities, compromising their ability to protect public health, or deliver critical services like sewage disposal or adequate protection against storm surges and flooding. Many cities are acutely aware of these threats, and are developing climate adaptation plans with strategies to mitigate, and adapt to, climate change impacts. Read more >

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Digital Visual Library
Article (doi:10.1175/WCAS-D-15-0026.1) Declet-Barreto, J.; Knowlton, K.; Jenerette, G. D. & Buyantuev, A. Effects of urban vegetation on mitigating exposure of vulnerable populations to excessive heat in Cleveland, Ohio Weather, Climate, and Society, 0, 0, null Abstract: AbstractHot weather is a threat to human health, especially in cities, where Urban Heat Islands (UHIs) are elevating temperatures already on the rise from global climate change. Increased vegetation can help reduce temperatures and exposure to heat hazards. We conduct an ensemble of Geographically Weighted Regressions (GWR) on Land Surface Temperature (LST) for May-October to estimate potential LST reductions from increased vegetation and assess the effect of temperature reductions among vulnerable populations in Cleveland, Ohio, USA. We apply possible tree canopy increases to our results, finding that LST reductions can range from 6.4 to 0.5 °C for May-October, and are strongest from May-July. Potential LST reductions vary spatially according to possible canopy increases, are highest in suburban fringe neighborhoods and lower in downtown areas. Among populations at high heat-related health risks, the percentage of the population 65 years of age or older in Cleveland is negatively associated with LST, while percentages of Hispanics and those with low educational achievement are most positively associated with higher LST. Percent Hispanic also has the lowest potential temperature reductions from increased vegetation. Neighborhoods with the highest potential temperature reductions had the highest percentages of Whites. Three sub-populations associated with high heat health risks are negatively correlated (African-Americans, the elderly) or not correlated (persons living in poverty) with LST, and the relationships to LST reduction potential for all three are not statistically significant. Our estimates of the effect of vegetation increases on LST can be used to target specific neighborhoods for UHI mitigation under possible and achievable, policy-prescribed tree canopy scenarios in Cleveland.
Bookmark and Share

hlmwed

Obama in China: Lessons from the Red Carpet

, China project manager and senior analyst

President Obama’s precipitate decent onto a Chinese red carpet generated more media attention than what could be a planet-saving commitment to combat climate change. This triumph of the trivial raises important questions about the future of US-China relations.

Read more >

Bookmark and Share