climate impacts


Oil and Gas: What We Know is Concerning, but What We Don’t is Worse

, UCS Science Network

The U.S. continues to promote and extract domestic oil and gas, even when the market is flooded with this product. Why? Because the collective “we” demands it. Read more >

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Why Climate Finance Matters to Real People

, UCS Science Network

We humans are used to the climate of the places where we live, regardless of how extreme they may be. I witnessed this first-hand during my time in Churchill with Polar Bears International, just a few weeks before COP21. While we were there to track the bears, I found that locals were waiting just as impatiently for the water to freeze and snow to fall, so they could head out to their cabins and trap lines. For all who live in the Arctic, life begins in the winter. But this winter—as in so many winters, lately – the sea ice was late to come, and both bears and people remained trapped on land well into December. Read more >

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Who Brings What to the Global Potluck?

, UCS Science Network

In the aftermath of the weekend celebrations over the Paris Accord, disappointment that the legally binding aspects of the Paris Accord did not include the emission reductions and financing commitments populate my Twitter and Facebook feeds. Does that mean the agreement is a failure? Should we tear it up? Not at all! In fact, the separation of the legally binding versus the voluntary aspects of the accord was a careful, deliberate, and—at least in my opinion—very intelligent choice. And here’s why.

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The 25-Year Road to Paris: Talking COP with Alden Meyer

, UCS Science Network

Alden Meyer, director of strategy and policy for the Union of Concerned Scientists has been in attendance at all but one of the Conference Of Parties (COP) meetings organized by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) since they began in 1990. Read more >

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Letter from Paris: Impressions from the Inside

, UCS Science Network

Earlier this week, police and climate demonstrators clashed in front of the memorial to the victims of last month’s terror attack. The influence of these tragic events has been evident throughout COP21. During the first few days, with many world leaders in attendance, military snipers staked out the rooftops and low hills surrounding Le Bourget, the site of the negotiations and meetings. Metal detectors, bag searches, and mounted police abound. There’s no doubt the event is changed: it’s smaller, with higher security, and fewer high profile public events. Read more >

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