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Posts Tagged ‘coal’

Surprisingly, West Virginians Support Raising Taxes on the Coal Industry–Even in Coal Country

What a week. President Obama delivered a major speech on climate change on Tuesday, directing the Environmental Protection Agency to carry out its obligations under existing law and limit carbon emissions from both new and existing power plants.

As a scientist studying climate change, I’m excited by the President’s leadership. He articulated the reality of the problem that we face, and why it’s so important that we act today to prepare for climate change that’s already locked in and protect future generations by cutting emissions. Read More

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Labor and Environment: “Joined at the Hip”

Since its launching in 2006, the Blue-Green Alliance (BGA) has united some of the largest and most impactful unions, environmental, and science-based organizations in an effort to accelerate the transition to a clean and prosperous energy economy. As proud members of the BGA, the Union of Concerned Scientists was well represented at their annual Good Jobs, Green Jobs conference in Washington, DC last week. My colleague and UCS Kendall Fellow Jeremy Richardson was an active participant and logged the following report: Read More

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Zombies, Glee, and Coal on Earth Day: New Mashup Report on Coal’s Water Dependence

In the fine tradition of mashups that have produced zombie-enhanced classic novels and cutting-edge high school music efforts, a new UCS mini-report is a stimulating amalgamation of two exciting areas of UCS research, pointing to additional bonuses from closing old coal plants. This Earth Day, you can celebrate water savings, too. Read More

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Happy World Water Day! (Celebrate by Saving Energy!)

If you’re all done with your vernal equinox celebrations and looking for another excuse to party, you’re in luck. It may not show up on your run-of-the-mill cute-puppy-dog calendar, but it turns out that today is World Water Day. If you’re looking for a way to celebrate it, you could do worse than finding some way to save energy. Read More

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Connecting the Dots: What Recent Events Mean For Our Energy-Water Future

Events of the last few days say a lot about our politics, our planet, and our prospects. When it comes to thinking about our energy-water future, three events in particular stand out: NOAA’s news about 2012 temperatures, Georgia Power’s announcement about power plant retirements, and the renewable energy pieces of Washington’s recent fiscal deal. Read More

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Fact Check: Koch-Funded Group Misleads Michigan Voters on Clean Energy

On November 6, Michigan voters will decide on Proposal 3, a renewable electricity standard (RES) that requires utilities to increase their use of clean, renewable energy sources like wind and solar to 25 percent by 2025. The initiative is affordable and will deliver important economic and environmental benefits. But a flawed and biased study released last week by the Koch-funded Mackinac Center for Public Policy and Beacon Hill Institute threatens to undermine Proposal 3 and stall Michigan’s progress toward a clean energy future. Read More

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Burning Coal, Burning Cash in Michigan

Michigan’s two largest electric service providers—Detroit Edison and Consumers Energy—seem to prefer sending billions of ratepayer dollars out of state to pay for coal imports rather than investing more in homegrown renewable energy that will provide help to the local economy. Michigan voters will get an opportunity to change that this November by supporting Prop 3, a ballot initiative that would require the state to get 25 percent of its power from renewable energy sources like the wind and sun by 2025. Read More

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On the Road to Clean Energy in Germany: Lessons for the United States – Part 3

The third stop on our renewable energy tour of Germany was the state of North-Rhine Westphalia— the industrial, steelmaking, and coal mining center of the country—where we learned about the economic and social ramifications of Germany’s transition away from coal to renewable energy, and what lessons might be applied to the U.S. Read More

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