Community Connections


Community-based Participatory Science is Changing the Way Research Happens—and What Happens Next

Judy Robinson,

When I started working in environmental health the general rule was “the dose makes the poison.” But then new breakthroughs in endocrine disrupting chemicals turned that theory on its ear, showing how some low-dose effects can be more severe than doses at higher levels. Read more >

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College/Underserved Community Partnership Program: Building a Better Tomorrow through the Power of Partnerships

Michael W. Burns, Senior Advisor for the Regional Administrator
, , UCS

What if there was a federal program that connected universities and underserved communities to work together to address critical issues? Would you be surprised if I told you that program already existed? What if I told you that program was created in part to improve the efficiency of government spending—would that shock you? Read more >

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Why Community-Based Research Matters to Science and People

Lauren Richter, Doctoral Student
, , UCS

When and how does research serve people? When and how does community-based participatory research improve the “rigor, relevance and reach” of science itself? Today we are witnessing an increase in collaborative research projects that seek to address environmental and environmental health issues in polluted communities. While an academic scientist may have access to labs and facilities, a community living near an industrial-scale hog farm in North Carolina may have unique insights about the types of exposures and acute and chronic health impacts they routinely feel and observe. Read more >

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Community Connections: Scientist-Citizens Have a Critical Role to Play

, director, Center for Science & Democracy

Many community organizations struggle to be heard in our noisy democracy. Even on critical issues such as air and water quality, health hazards from chemicals, local food policy, environmental justice for disadvantaged communities, and the rising challenges of global warming, their voices and needs are often drowned out by those who argue that addressing public health, safety and the environment is too expensive. That those concerns get in the way of economic growth. And too often, the views of community organizations are dismissed because their arguments are not framed in technical terms. Read more >

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