Conflict of Interest


A vat of corn syrup

New FDA Ruling Doesn’t Close Industry’s Favorite Food Safety Loophole

, science and policy analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

It doesn’t seem like too much to ask for the public to be able to count on the FDA to ensure that all substances added to foods are proven safe. The FDA disappointed many interested in a safer food system earlier this month when it released its final ruling detailing its authority for the Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) process. Read more >

Photo: tracyshaun
Flickr/Uwe Hermann
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The Trouble with Science Funding

, lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

“We should acknowledge the elephant in the room” one panelist said.

Last week I attended a half-day event put on by Scientific American.  The topic was media coverage of scientific topics and the “elephant” was the event’s corporate sponsorship. Read more >

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Willie Soon, Academic Freedom, and How We Can Deal With Undisclosed Conflicts of Interest

, lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

In the last week, the Internet has blown up. There were llamas, dresses, and bird-riding weasels. But what also blew up was an important discussion about conflict of interest disclosure and what information academic scientists should be expected to make public. Above all else, the debate has made clear that conflict of interest disclosure rules are lacking and that we need clarity from Congress, scientific societies, and academic institutions on how these issues should be addressed. Read more >

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Spring Brings Hope–Even about Transparency and Accountability in Government

, , sr. Washington rep., Center for Science & Democracy

There is some good, albeit modest, news about the Food and Drug Administration and the way the agency addresses conflicts of interest on FDA advisory panels that consider the safety and efficacy of drugs and medical devices. Read more >

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How Disclosure Changed a Conversation on Fracking (And Why that Matters)

, lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

Last week, I moderated a session on fracking at the annual fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU). The event went as we planned with seven speakers presenting their work on unconventional oil and gas development, but after the formal talks when we opened a panel discussion with questions from the audience, something unexpected happened. Read more >

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