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Posts Tagged ‘corporate political activities’

Why We Need an Executive Order on Political Spending: An Open Letter to President Obama

Dear President Obama,

You’ve had a great week. With the Affordable Care Act upheld and nationwide marriage equality now the law, you must feel like celebrating. But wait!  Why not carry this momentum and take another step that would increase the equality and well-being of Americans?  I’m talking about an executive order asking government contractors to disclose their political spending. Read More

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Will Shell Leave ALEC? An Executive Hints At An Exit

Ask and you shell receive? (Sorry. Had to take that one.) It may be so. Last week, Shell CEO Ben van Beurden hinted that the company may leave the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) by not renewing its membership, according to an interview with the Guardian. The statement comes after increasing pressure on Shell to leave the climate-misinformation-spreading lobbying organization. Read More

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Peabody Energy, the EPA Clean Power Plan, and Corporate Consistency on Climate Change

I’ve talked a lot here about companies’ positions on climate change and how they do or don’t agree with other statements and actions companies take—from alignment with their trade group’s position, to looking at how they talk about their own climate risks, to taking a broader look at all company actions to help or inhibit progress on addressing climate change. Read More

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Shell Promises Climate Risk Disclosure to Shareholders, but What About Its Political Spending?

UPDATE, May 15, 2015:

At Shell’s Annual General Meeting on May 19, investors will consider a shareholder resolution calling for greater disclosure of the risks climate change poses to the company’s bottom line. Shell’s call for shareholders to unanimously approve this resolution is noteworthy for its strong endorsement of investors’ demands for greater transparency around the company’s political activities on climate change. Read More

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Who Stands with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce on Climate Change? New Data Says Few (Still)

Last year the CEO of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s Institute for 21st Century Energy Karen Alderman Harbert had some trouble articulating the business group’s position on climate change. During a hearing in the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Senator Bob Menendez asked Ms. Harbert if the Chamber believed climate change was real and human-caused—yes or no. Read More

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Three Ways Citizens United Helped Undermine Science Policy Debates

Five years ago next week the Supreme Court issued a decision that would soon have major impacts on our political system.  In Citizens United v. FEC, the court ruled that spending limits violated free speech, opening the floodgates to vastly increased political spending by corporate interests. Read More

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Why Shell Should Leave ALEC

Let me (be) very very clear, for us climate change is real and it’s a threat that we want to act on. We’re not aligning with skeptics.

-Ben van Beurden, CEO of Royal Dutch Shell

Years ago, such a statement from the head of a major oil producer might have raised an eyebrow, but these days, most companies stick with the science if they choose to talk about climate change. Unfortunately, companies’ actions don’t necessarily align with their words. Read More

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On the SEC Disclosure Rule, the People Have Spoken

One million comments. Today I’m celebrating one million comments.  What’s the significance of one million comments? Let me explain. Read More

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Companies, Trade Groups, and Climate Change: Why We Need an SEC Rule on Corporate Political Disclosure

Today marks the 4th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s landmark decision in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission. But the decision–which opened the floodgates to unlimited corporate political spending–isn’t just of interest to political and legal scholars. If you care about science-based policy, you also have a dog in this fight. Read More

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New UCS Report: Companies Can Anonymously Influence Climate Policy Through Their Business and Trade Associations

Today we release our new report, Tricks of the Trade: How Companies Influence Climate Policy Through Business and Trade Associations. In the report we found that many companies choose not to be transparent about their affiliations with trade and business associations, even when the information is publicly available. In addition, we found that when companies did choose to disclose their trade group board seats, many claimed to disagree with their associations’ positions on climate change, raising questions about who trade groups are actually representing on climate policy. Read More

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