cover crops


Soils to Reverse Climate Change: “Carbon Farming” and the Untapped Potential in Ecological Approaches

, Kendall Science Fellow

Are there agricultural practices that might offer more potential than the ones commonly discussed in the “carbon farming” conversation? In a companion post, I wrote about what the science tells us about cover cropping and reduced tillage, two practices getting a lot of attention in what I’ve called the “carbon farming” rage. Read more >

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Soils to Reverse Climate Change: What Do We Know about “Carbon Farming” Practices?

, Kendall Science Fellow

“Carbon farming,” in my world as a scientist who studies soils and crop production, seems to be all the rage these days in the media. The idea is to build up carbon in soil while drawing down carbon in the atmosphere through improved soil management. Read more >

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What You Get When You Vote With Your Dollar: The Case of Organic Wheat

Steven Rosenzweig, Ph.D. student, , UCS

If you buy organic food with the intention of catalyzing change in agriculture, it may be paying off. To address the wide gap between supply and demand, the nation’s largest flour producer Ardent Mills announced an initiative at the end of last year to double US organic wheat acreage by 2019 – a plan that could encourage a shift toward organic agriculture on hundreds of thousands of acres of American farmland. Read more >

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Carandale Farm, Oregon, WI: Colleagues from UCS, the Savanna Institute, and I tasting seaberries with farmer, researcher, and owner Dale Secher. Dale researches non-traditional fruit crops that can support more sustainable, local food systems.

The ABCD’s of Agroecology: What Is It All About?

, agroecologist

What makes agroecology so great (as I have said before!) is that it combines the best of two time-tested disciplines, ecology and agriculture, to pursue solutions for a healthier world. The list of experts who have agreed that agroecology can address many major challenges keeps growing, but what is this really all about? Read more >

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Counting the Benefits of Agroecology: We Have the Tools, Let’s Use Them

, agroecologist

With global challenges such as diminishing environmental quality and public health, combined with accelerating climate change, we need more than ever to know how to confront many problems at once. Since plants inhale carbon dioxide and soils store carbon, there are numerous reasons to expect agriculture to play a significant role for improving the human prospect. Indeed, scientific research documents that we have tools to achieve ecological and climatic sustainability, but here’s the catch—we have to use them. Read more >

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