Department of Interior


Federal Science Advisory Boards Under Threat: Why Scientists Should Get Involved

, director, Center for Science & Democracy

Serving on a science advisory board for a federal agency is an interesting and in many ways rewarding experience for a scientist. I have been on a research advisory board for the Navy, advisory boards for assessing the impacts of climate change, and for the National Academy of Sciences as well on several international boards. I always find the work challenging, I learn a lot and I feel like I am making a real contribution to both science and policy-making. So, it is an honor to serve even when providing advice on contentious topics. Read more >

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Department of Interior Censors USGS Press Release on Climate Change, Flooding, and Sea Level Rise

, Deputy director, Center for Science & Democracy

Late yesterday, the Washington Post reported that the United States Geological Survey deleted a sentence acknowledging the link between climate change and sea level rise from an official agency press release. The USGS describes itself as the sole science agency for the Department of Interior. UCS will today formally ask the department to investigate the deletion as a violation of departmental policy. Read more >

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Congressman Ryan Zinke Photo: Gage Skidmore/Flickr

Ryan Zinke on Climate Change: What You Should Know about Trump’s Choice for Department of Interior

, deputy director, Climate & Energy Program

US natural and cultural resources—the parks, landmarks, and history of America—are under assault from climate change. So it is troubling that Ryan Zinke, Trump’s pick to run the Department of the Interior (DOI), seems unsure whether climate change is a real problem or not. Read more >

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Freedom to Tweet? Government Scientists and the Right to Engage on Social Media

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

Social media has done great things for science. We’ve seen it educate, advocate, and communicate on scientific issues around the world and at an unimaginable speed. Social media has allowed open science to thrive, scientists to connect, and movements to start. It allows us to organize, debate, and discuss breaking news on science-related topics. As my colleague Aaron has said, when Neil deGrasse Tyson has more Twitter followers than Seth Rogen, we know that social media has potential for communication of science. Read more >

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Interior Department Updates Scientific Integrity Policy and Creates Handbook

, Deputy director, Center for Science & Democracy

The Department of the Interior came out late yesterday with the 3.0 version of its scientific integrity policy, along with a new handbook that describes how the policy will be implemented. The new materials are simplified, streamlined, and more clear, bringing the department once again to the front of the pack in the Obama administration’s quest to create strong scientific integrity standards within federal agencies and departments. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell is expected to speak about the new policy in a keynote address today before the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco.

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