Disclosure


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The White House has proposed a rule asking companies that do business with the government about their climate change related disclosures. The rule is a good step toward greater transparency around companies' responses to climate change. Photo: FEMA/Patsy Lynch

Should Climate Change Disclosure Be Required for Companies? Government Suppliers Are About to Find Out.

, lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

Lest we forget, climate change poses serious risks for businesses. It makes sense that the White House is increasingly interested in how well government suppliers are prepared for the impacts. Read more >

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Peabody Energy Discloses Extensive Payments to Climate Denial Groups

, lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

Aside from the sheer amount of money Peabody devoted to climate denial, what shocks me most about the bankruptcy filings is how much we didn’t know without them. A startling lack of transparency surrounds corporate political activities, and these documents prove it. Read more >

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With the First Lawsuit Against ExxonMobil for Climate Deception Announced, What Do We Know About Its Risk from Climate Change Impacts?

, lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

In the latest development on ExxonMobil’s long (and ongoing) history of deceiving the public and decision makers on climate change, the Conservation Law Foundation (CLF) announced this week that it is preparing for the first official lawsuit against the oil and petrochemical giant for its climate deception. Read more >

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Who Obstructs Global Action On Climate Change? More Companies Than You Think, According To A New Analysis

, lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

UPDATE (Sep. 16, 4:05 p.m.): InsideClimate News reported this morning new evidence showing that ExxonMobil knew about the harms of global warming way back in 1977—several years before the 1981 ExxonMobil internal documents that UCS shared a few weeks ago. In fact, Exxon didn’t just know about the reality of global warming then, they were conducting scientific studies on the quantity, trends, and future impact of human-caused emissions of carbon dioxide. Instead of preparing for these future challenges, the company instead chose to bury this deep scientific understanding and engage in more than 30 years of deceiving the public about the dangers of global warming. Read more >

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Are Oil Companies Ready for the Next Katrina?

, lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

Ten years ago this week, a hurricane was gaining strength in the North Atlantic.  Meteorologists worked around the clock to understand and predict its future path and strength. That path and strength, it turns out, would make the record books. Read more >

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