electric car


National Research Council on Electric Vehicles: Clean and Getting Cleaner

, senior engineer, Clean Vehicles

The National Research Council (NRC) released a report yesterday on electric vehicles and the barriers to adoption. The report, “Overcoming Barriers to Deployment of Plug-in Electric Vehicles,” addresses some of the key obstacles to plug-in electric vehicle adoption. Importantly, the report also validates UCS’s own analysis: electric vehicles are clean today and will get cleaner as we continue to switch to better sources of electricity, like wind and solar power. Read more >

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Electric Vehicles: The Right Choice for Oregon

, senior engineer, Clean Vehicles

Oregon is considering bolstering electric vehicle (EV) adoption with purchase incentives for consumers who want to buy or lease EVs. That would be a great idea as EVs can help Oregonians reduce both global warming emissions and fuel costs. Read more >

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How do EVs Compare with Gas-Powered Vehicles? Better Every Year….

, research and deputy director, Clean Vehicles

As we embark on the 4th annual National Drive Electric Week, U.S. electric vehicle (EV) sales are approaching a quarter million, and 20 plug-in models are now available in at least some parts of the country. This represents a major advancement from the first introduction of the Chevy Volt and Nissan Leaf plug-in electric vehicles in model year 2011. Read more >

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How Much Money Can You Save By Switching to an Electric Car?

, senior engineer, Clean Vehicles

University of California at Davis’ Plug-in Hybrid & Electric Vehicle Research Center has just released a great tool for finding out how much you could save by switching from a gasoline vehicle to an electric vehicle. Read more >

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It’s Electric! The Science of Cleaner Vehicles

, UCS Science Network

I’m a biochemist by training, but my family’s leap into Electric Vehicle (EV) driving was not entirely a reasoned scientific choice, initially. We have always been energy-conscious, even before climate change was on our radar. We have always tried to live near our workplaces to save fuel and time. When hybrid vehicles came on the market, we did not seriously consider buying one, because it did not make economic sense for us; our savings on fuel would never match the difference in up-front price of a hybrid at that time.  The BP oil spill on April 20, 2010 changed the equation for us. Read more >

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