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Posts Tagged ‘energy efficiency’

How do EVs Compare with Gas-Powered Vehicles? Better Every Year….

As we embark on the 4th annual National Drive Electric Week, U.S. electric vehicle (EV) sales are approaching a quarter million, and 20 plug-in models are now available in at least some parts of the country. This represents a major advancement from the first introduction of the Chevy Volt and Nissan Leaf plug-in electric vehicles in model year 2011. Read More

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Pennsylvania and the Clean Power Plan

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed the first-ever limits on carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants, designed to begin to address the consequences of climate change. The agency has proposed a flexible framework that allows states to decide for themselves how to meet the emissions reductions targets. For many states, the required emissions reductions are actually quite modest, and at UCS we see an opportunity for states to be more ambitious in developing renewable energy in particular. Here I explore what the carbon standard means for Pennsylvania. Read More

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How Virginia Can Meet and Exceed Its Targets under the EPA Power Plant Carbon Standard

On June 2, the EPA issued draft carbon standards for existing power plants. The standard sets state-specific goals for emissions rate reductions that are expected to add up to nationwide power sector emissions reductions of 30 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. We analyzed Virginia’s target and found that the state is well on track to meet – and can even exceed – its required goal. Read More

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Clean Energy Leaders and Laggards: How Utilities Stack Up

Utilities are lynchpins in moving us toward the clean energy future we need to see. But how quickly they’re helping us move in that direction varies greatly. A really useful new report from Ceres and Clean Edge looks at who’s leading and who’s lagging among U.S. utilities. Read More

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Brilliance from Sea to Shining Sea: Which States are the Clean Energy Superstars?

A great new report from the smart folks at CleanEdge looks in depth at which states are leading the clean energy charge in the United States. And, given the many ways to look at, the list of clean energy superstars is long. Here are eight slices from their analysis. Read More

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Good Jobs, Green Jobs: Moving Freight More Efficiently

A couple weeks ago, I noted that we can reduce fuel consumption from the average new commercial truck by 40 percent in 2025. Improving the efficiency of these vehicles is a key component of our overall Half the Oil plan. But one of the reasons why reducing fuel from medium- and heavy-duty vehicles is so important is because they are strongly integrated into American commerce—everything you buy ends up on a truck at some point along the way. Read More

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Renewables and Efficiency: Opportunities in the Federal Carbon Standards

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is poised to release the first-ever carbon standards for existing power plants in early June. Since the electricity sector is responsible for about 40 percent of our nation’s carbon dioxide emissions, these standards are a critical component of President Obama’s Climate Action Plan—a series of actions the administration is taking to address the impacts of climate change, which are happening now and getting worse. Renewable energy and energy efficiency are swift and cost-effective ways to achieve the deep cuts in carbon emissions needed to tackle the climate crisis, and can provide a multitude of benefits to states and communities. Read More

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Michigan Needs a Stronger Renewable Energy Standard

Guest Bogger

Dr. John Patten
Professor and Chair, Department of Manufacturing Engineering, and Director, Manufacturing Research Center, Western Michigan University

Kalamazoo, MI

The idea of switching over to renewable energy really came together for me during the oil embargoes of the 1970s, while I was in college and working at General Motors. I could not get gas for my car and we could not get enough oil for lubricants, cutting fluids and hydraulics at work. These events put me on a 40-year career path working in clean energy, starting with studying solar energy at the University of Florida and Oakland University, to working as an energy engineer, and I’ve been practicing and implementing what I learned ever since. Read More

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When Should Nuclear Power Pay for Risk? Is Never Good For You?

In a secret negotiation result reported by Hannah Northey, E&E News, the nuclear industry passed along another risk to the U.S. public. An expected $300 million loan fee for building the new Vogtle nuclear plant, was negotiated down to zero by the plant owners. This was one of two nuclear power issues that came out of the shadows of secrecy and unaccounted costs this week. Read More

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Proposal to Dismantle Ohio’s Clean Energy Standards Based More on Science Fiction than Fact

The proposal to dismantle Ohio’s clean energy standards remains on the table as the Ohio legislature takes a recess until May. The rationale behind this proposal, however, doesn’t hold water and Ohio legislators should reject it when they return to Columbus. Read More

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