environmental justice


Environmental Injustice in the Early Days of the Trump Administration

Britt Paris and Rebecca Lave, , UCS

When the EPA was established in 1970 by Richard Nixon, there was no mandate to examine why toxic landfills were more often placed near low-income, Black, Latino, immigrant, and Native American communities than in more affluent, white neighborhoods. Nor was there much recognition that communities closer to toxic landfills, refineries, and industrial plants often experienced higher rates of toxics-related illnesses, like cancer and asthma.

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Pesticide Action Network
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Trump Budget Bares Wholesale Disregard for Environmental Justice Communities, But a New Bill Gives Hope

, Kendall Science Fellow

Many low-income communities and communities of color in the U.S. have not always enjoyed the environmental and public health benefits of environmental safeguards. These communities and their advocates have long demanded redress of the unequal environmental burdens they experience, and had been hopeful that the progress made under President Obama’s EPA would continue and improve under a new administration.

But those hopes were recently dashed by President Trump’s proposed EPA budget, which allocates exactly zero dollars and zero cents to Environmental Justice programs within the agency. Read more >

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“You Need to Move Beyond Surviving to Thriving”: A Conversation with Mustafa Ali

Before he resigned in March as assistant associate administrator for environmental justice at the Environmental Protection Agency, Mustafa Ali was not a household name. He received virtually no national press during his 24 years of holding the White House and 17 federal agencies accountable for embedding environmental justice into policy making. Under a 1994 executive order issued by President Clinton, every agency was supposed to identify and address “disproportionately high and adverse human health or environmental effects of its programs on people of color and low-income communities. Read more >

Photo: Moms Clean Air Force/CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 (Flickr)
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Cedar Mesa Citadel ruins in Bears Ears National Monument. One of thousands of tribal cultural and archaeological sites there. Photo: U.S. Bureau of Land Management

President Trump’s Assault on the Antiquities Act Signals Trouble for National Parks and Monuments

, deputy director, Climate & Energy Program

Without the Antiquities Act, now under attack by the Trump administration as part of its strategy to roll-back environmental protections and open public lands to increased exploitation for coal, oil and minerals, we might never have had the benefit of the Grand Canyon, Olympic or Acadia national parks. An attack on national monuments is an attack on us all, and the histories we share. Read more >

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Marching for Science and Climate Protects Our Communities

Josué J. López, , UCS

Until three years ago, you could have called me a scientist, educator, or mentor—but not an activist or marcher. Over time, however, I have recognized that I have the knowledge, privilege, and responsibility to act and march to protect the communities I love. Read more >

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