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Posts Tagged ‘equity’

Doing More to Protect Frontline Communities Ten Years After Katrina

As we come up on the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, the terrible devastation wrought by the hurricane is in the headlines again. For those who experienced the storm first-hand, the ongoing struggle to recover is ever-present and this must be a wrenching anniversary. What can we do as a nation to support frontline communities to be better prepared and protected for future disasters? How can we better account for the growing risks to coastal communities, especially in light of sea level rise and worsening storm surge?  And how can we ensure that we channel our investments in an equitable way so as to build resilience in all communities? Read More

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Climate Justice: Why Vulnerable Communities Need Resilience Investments

Today the White House announced a series of actions targeted at building climate resilience among vulnerable communities, including low-income, tribal, and some communities of color. This is a welcome step, and one that the environmental justice community has been asking for ever since President announced his Climate Action Plan two years ago. Read More

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What Does the Pope’s Climate Encyclical Mean?

Pope Francis released his much-anticipated encyclical on humans’ stewardship of our planet earlier today. While my colleagues and I spend most of our time talking about science and policy, the pope’s message has given us an opportunity to reflect on our own moral reasoning around climate and energy issues as well as the intersection of faith and science.

Update, June 23: My colleague Mike Jacobs, a senior energy analyst, added his thoughts in a separate post about Pope Francis’s plug for electric co-cops and other clean energy issues in the encyclical. Read More

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Sea Level Rise, Growing Flood Risks, and the Need for a Strong Federal Flood Risk Management Standard

On January 30, 2015, President Obama issued an executive order to strengthen the Federal Flood Risk Management Standard (FFRMS) and create an extensive stakeholder process for implementing it. Tomorrow is the comment deadline for the implementation guidelines proposed by FEMA and UCS has weighed in with support for a strong FFRMS. Read More

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From Baltimore Protests to Food: The Importance of Community Voices

Two months ago I was in Baltimore for a conference focusing on healthy food access. Before the opening reception I squeezed in a run. With temperatures well below freezing, I ran down to the Harbor where the water was frozen and the cargo ships were still. There was hardly anyone in sight. I was amazed at the quietness blanketing the city. Read More

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Building Community Power: Science and Storytelling

Guest Bogger

Miranda Chien-Hale
Master of Environmental Management Candidate, Duke University

Durham, North Carolina

My class on California’s water crisis finished a few minutes early last week. I immediately rushed over to Duke University’s Bryan Center, hoping to still grab a bit of food before Paul Greenberg, author of Four Fish, began his talk. I managed to scoop up two appetizers before I headed into the theatre. Read More

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Counting the Cost of Climate Disasters: What do Hurricane Sandy and Typhoon Haiyan Tell Us About What the U.S. and the Philippines Have in Common?

Angela Anderson, Director of the UCS Climate and Energy program, is in Warsaw for the latest round of international climate talks. In the political wake of typhoon Haiyan, she sent me this urgent dispatch about why developed and developing nations alike must consider the costs of climate impacts. And why she’s joined other activists who are fasting in solidarity with the Philippines’ chief negotiator: Read More

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