Fed Up


How to Keep New Year’s (and Deforestation-Free) Resolutions

, analyst, Tropical Forest & Climate Initiative

This year, I will be reducing the amount of sugar in my diet. To give myself every advantage, I’m planning ahead. I looked up tips and tricks for keeping New Year’s resolutions. As I began to write down the findings listed on multiple websites, I realized that everything advised for keeping personal resolutions has a corollary in the corporate world for making and following through on strong palm oil and deforestation-free pledges. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

3 Ways of Looking at a Peanut Butter Sandwich—Or, the Challenge of Avoiding Added Sugar

, , former analyst, Center for Science & Democracy

If you haven’t yet seen the movie “the food industry doesn’t want you to see,” now—as the kids are heading back to school—is the perfect time. Preceding our Lewis M. Branscomb forum on science, democracy, and food policy last May, UCS hosted a pre-release screening of Fed Up that left audience members setting aside their sugary drinks and greasy tubs of popcorn in awe.   Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Not Easy to Declare Independence from Sugar

, , sr. Washington rep., Center for Science & Democracy

Our Center for Science and Democracy has been busy studying sugar, its health impacts, and the ways that the sugar industry tries to undermine the science that shows that sugar is not a sweet deal for American families. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Dear Surgeon General: We’re Fed Up, Let’s Act on Sugar

, , lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

When I was a child, I would read the ingredients on food packages. Nearly every package I picked up began with the same ingredient. “What’s high fructose corn syrup?” I asked my Mom.  “I don’t know,” my mom said, “but we could certainly get rich from selling it. It’s in everything!” Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Added Sugar, Subtracted Science: A New Report and a Labeling Debate at the FDA

, , lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

As a researcher focused on how science is used and misused in policy debates, I’ve seen more than my fair share of interference in (what should be) evidence-based decision making. But when I first dug into the details featured in our new report, Added Sugar, Subtracted Science, even I had to raise an eyebrow. Read more >

Bookmark and Share