florida


4 Reasons to Vote NO on Florida’s (Anti-) Solar Amendment 1

, senior energy analyst, Clean Energy

UPDATE (November 9, 2016): You did it, Florida! The utilities and their Koch-funded allies way outspent opponents in their push to get this anti-solar measure passed. But Amendment 1 still got only 51% of the vote—way short of the 60% it needed to pass. Even when companies and organizations muddy the waters and throw up smokescreens, solar still shines bright. Well done, Sunshine State.

Floridians are making a lot of important choices next week. One that’s not getting quite the same level of attention, but is important anyway, is about a ballot initiative on solar. Anything having to do with solar must be a great thing, right? That’s just what the proponents want us to think. Here are four reasons why Florida voters should reject this anti-solar “solar” proposal: Read more >

Floridians for Solar Choice
Energy and Policy Institute
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Scientist in the Field: On the Ground in Flooded Florida Neighborhoods

, climate scientist

In some cases children couldn’t get to their school bus stops. One resident had to walk through contaminated flood waters and subsequently had a leg infection. Another resident told me that in order to take the trash out, she had to cover her legs in garbage bags. There are already so many stories of people struggling to deal with tidal flooding. Read more >

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How to Prepare for Sea Level Rise: Follow New Hampshire’s Lead

, former science communication officer

New Hampshire has the nation’s shortest coastline, at less than 20 miles, but don’t let that statistic fool you: when scientists count its bays, tidal rivers, and salt marshes, they tally more than 230 miles of so-called inland tidal shoreline. These areas are vitally important for New Hampshire’s economy, especially when it comes to tourism and shipping. They’re also vulnerable to coastal flooding, which is why the state is using the best available science to plan for the future, including rising seas. Read more >

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We Must Find Smart Ways to Prepare for Climate Change, or Growing Risks Could Lead to Fiscal Disasters

, senior climate scientist

The effects of climate change are becoming more apparent every day, from the mountains, to the prairies, to the oceans, white with bleached coral. Policy makers are beginning to realize that science can help them anticipate how risks are changing along with the climate, and this knowledge could help them control the costs of climate-related disasters, which taxpayers often bear. Thus, getting a handle on these risks is a crucial first step toward fiscally responsible policy – but some of our leaders still want to deny the problem. For taxpayers, this is a rare case in which doing something is cheaper than doing nothing at all. Read more >

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Tallahassee, We Have a Problem: The Harm Done by Florida’s Climate Leadership Void

, senior analyst, Climate & Energy Program

What could justify the Governor of Florida, a state widely considered “ground-zero” for climate change in the U.S., to prohibit the use of that term by state staff? Read more >

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