food labeling


Added Sugar, Subtracted Science: A New Report and a Labeling Debate at the FDA

, lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

As a researcher focused on how science is used and misused in policy debates, I’ve seen more than my fair share of interference in (what should be) evidence-based decision making. But when I first dug into the details featured in our new report, Added Sugar, Subtracted Science, even I had to raise an eyebrow. Read more >

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Fed Up about Food? New Film Highlights Concerns around Sugar, Science, and Democracy

, lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

Today, a new documentary entitled Fed Up premieres in 19 cities. Different from other films that detail the problems that plague our food system, Fed Up focuses on a single entity that is responsible for widespread health impacts in the United States: sugar. Read more >

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Sugar-coating Science: How the Food Industry Misleads Consumers on Sugar

, democracy analyst, Center for Science & Democracy

When I was growing up, my parents strictly limited the amount of sugar I was allowed to eat. I remember one day throwing a tantrum in the grocery store—I must have been 4 or 5—because my mother wouldn’t buy me Froot Loops. I shook the box up and down, transfixed by the big, colorful cartoon bird on the front, and wailed, “But I waaaaant it!” She snatched the box, “No way! The first ingredient is SUGAR.” Read more >

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A Contrary Perspective on the AAAS Board Statement Against Labeling of Engineered Foods

, senior scientist, Food and Environment

As a long-time member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and as a scientist, I was disappointed at the inaccurate information in the statement by the Board against labeling of genetically engineered (GE) foods. Read more >

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More Reasons for Labeling of Genetically Engineered Foods

, senior scientist, Food and Environment

As I noted yesterday, the cost to consumers from labeling the processed foods that contain genetically engineered (GE) ingredients is likely to be very small. In most cases a few percent or less. As I also wrote, the right to know what is in our food is probably the most compelling reason for labeling GE foods. But there are other reasons why some may want to know whether our food contains GE ingredients. Two common reasons are concerns about health and environmental risks from GE food and crops. Read more >

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