fracking


Oil and Gas: What We Know is Concerning, but What We Don’t is Worse

, UCS Science Network

The U.S. continues to promote and extract domestic oil and gas, even when the market is flooded with this product. Why? Because the collective “we” demands it. Read more >

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A Holiday “Gift” We Could Do Without

, sr. Washington rep., Center for Science & Democracy

To most of us, December is a time for cookies, gifts and holiday parties. But if your job is advocating for science and democracy in Washington, D.C., the month of December is far less cheery: This is the time for a budget showdown. Read more >

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Is Fracking Safe Now? What the EPA’s Fracking and Drinking Water Study Really Says

, lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

Yesterday, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released its long-awaited (and heavily scrutinized) report on drinking water impacts from hydraulic fracturing. The report has made headlines, but anyone following the science around fracking impacts shouldn’t be surprised by the results—that hydraulic fracturing has had adverse effects on drinking water sources in several cases, and that risk for future contamination of drinking water exists through several pathways.  Yet, yesterday’s headlines read very differently. Read more >

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Fracking in Colorado: Did the Oil and Gas Taskforce Finish Its Tasks?

, lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

When Colorado officials announced that they would set up a blue-ribbon taskforce charged with making informed recommendations on oil and gas development in the state, there were high hopes. In fact, I commended the state for establishing a strong procedure and promising mechanism for informed decision-making for fracking in Colorado. What an opportunity, I thought, for a science-informed decision in an otherwise science-lacking debate. Now that the commission has issued recommendations, it’s worth revisiting what happened. Did the taskforce succeed? Let’s walk through its moves. Read more >

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Governor Cuomo is Not a Scientist—So He Asked the Experts

, director, Center for Science & Democracy

In late October, I wrote about the disturbing trend of politicians copping out of taking public policy positions by saying, “I am not a scientist.” Well, yesterday we heard Governor Andrew Cuomo complete the sentence in a way that I applaud. He said, “…I’m not a scientist.  So let’s bring the emotion down, and let’s ask the qualified experts what their opinion is.” Read more >

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