fuel economy


Dear Automakers: Please Don’t Dismantle the Incredibly Successful Fuel Economy Standards

, senior vehicles analyst

In 2012, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) set joint fuel economy and global warming emissions standards for passenger vehicles out to 2025. These standards (taken together with those finalized in 2010), which cover new vehicles sold from 2012 through 2025, represent the biggest step the country has taken to reduce oil use and global warming emissions, and it’s already paying dividends. Read more >

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Photo: Unsplash

The 3 Biggest Mistakes You’ll Read in Transportation Stories This Year

, senior vehicles analyst

This week marks the close of the North American International Auto Show in Detroit and the opening of the show here in Washington, DC.  Following up on record-breaking 2015 auto sales as well as big debuts at both the Consumers Electronics Show and in Detroit, there’s been a lot of automotive coverage…not all of it good, unfortunately. For example, this piece in the Detroit News contains a whole host of errors common to coverage of the automotive industry—errors that this blog post is meant to help navigate. Read more >

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EPA Reports Show Automakers Still Ahead on Fuel Economy

, senior vehicles analyst

The EPA released two reports today detailing automakers’ compliance with global warming emissions standards and the technology improvements being deployed to meet these standards. Despite much public consternation from manufacturers about the difficulty in meeting these standards, manufacturers are more than one year ahead of schedule. Read more >

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Hey Congress—Don’t Let Automakers Undercut Fuel Standards with Phony Credits!

, senior vehicles analyst

Whether it’s the Volkswagen debacle (which continues to get worse), the massive Takata airbag recall involving just about every car company on the planet, or the GM ignition switch scandal, automakers have been in the news recently for all the wrong reasons. So it was no surprise when the Energy and Commerce Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives recently held a hearing on draft legislation regarding vehicles and roadway safety. After all, Congress should hold deceitful automakers accountable for their actions, and they should help ensure access to safe, clean vehicles.

It was a surprise, though, to see hidden provisions that would award fuel economy credits for safety technologies. If you are asking yourself, “What in the world does safety have to do with fuel economy?” you are not alone …

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Automaker Rankings Revisited—Does Volkswagen Now Have the “Dirtiest Tailpipe”?

, senior vehicles analyst

Last year, we released our semi-regular report card on the auto industry, the Automaker Rankings, where Volkswagen tied for 3rd place behind Hyundai-Kia and Honda. However, the astounding news this month around VW’s diesel vehicles is not only a black eye on the company—it also calls into question just how “green” the VW fleet truly is. We’ve received a lot of questions about the impact this scandal has on their environmental performance, so I’d like to take the opportunity to address some of those questions. Read more >

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