heat waves


Grand Haven pier extends into Lake Michigan, where average summer surface temperatures have risen markedly over recent decades. Photo: Rachel Kramer/Flickr

Great Lakes’ Great Changes: Temperatures Soar as the Climate Changes

Lake Michigan is not yet a hot tub, but the warming of this Great Lake gives you much to sweat about. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

What Does “Clean Energy Access for All” Mean in the Context of a Dangerous Heat Wave?

, lead economist and climate policy manager

The Obama administration has set some exciting goals to help ensure that the benefits of transitioning to clean energy accrue to all. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Dangerous Heat Wave to Grip the US: Top 10 Lessons to Survive Extreme Heat

, senior climate scientist

The US National Weather Service heat index forecast for June 18, 2016 looks scary.  It indicates a dangerous situation that everyone who lives in the red areas in the map below should take steps to prepare for. I am not kidding. Extreme heat can be life threatening if not taken seriously. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Crazy Hot Days, Crazy Warm Nights: A New Study on Climate Change in California’s Central Valley

, former scientist and Kendall Science Fellow

Last week I, along with an international group of scientists, published a study in the journal Climatic Change in which we found that the hottest summer days (24 hour periods) in the Central Valley were twice as likely to occur due to climate change. Heat waves in California’s Central Valley have become progressively more severe in recent decades due to  higher humidity and warmer nighttime temperatures. Observations obtained from NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center show that Central Valley nighttime temperatures were nearly 2°F (1°C) warmer in the 2000s compared to the 1901-1960 average and even higher for the whole of California (see plot below). Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Heat and Humidity, Climate Change, and the Future of the World Cup

, , former scientist and Kendall Science Fellow

A curious thing happened in the USA-Portugal match last Tuesday, played deep in the Amazon jungle in the city of Manaus. The players took a 1-minute break to drink some fluids. This was a new rule instituted by FIFA, the world’s soccer governing body, to allow players to recover during a match. Read more >

Bookmark and Share